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The Economic Impact of the Mining Boom on Indigenous and Non-Indigenous Australians

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  • Boyd Hunter
  • Monica Howlett
  • Matthew Gray

Abstract

Many mining operations are on or near Indigenous land, and the strong level of investment during the recent mining boom may have disproportionately affected Indigenous communities. This article examines changes in local Indigenous employment, income and housing costs to identify any localised ‘resource curse’ for Indigenous communities and the Australian population at large. Census data are used to show the mining boom has improved employment and income outcomes, but increased average housing costs. While the average increase in income has generally offset the increase in costs, housing stress for low-income households has increased as a result of the mining boom.

Suggested Citation

  • Boyd Hunter & Monica Howlett & Matthew Gray, 2015. "The Economic Impact of the Mining Boom on Indigenous and Non-Indigenous Australians," Asia and the Pacific Policy Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 2(3), pages 517-530, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:asiaps:v:2:y:2015:i:3:p:517-530
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/app5.99
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Nicholas Biddle & Boyd Hunter, 2006. "An Analysis of the Internal Migration of Indigenous and Non-indigenous Australians," Australian Journal of Labour Economics (AJLE), Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School, vol. 9(4), pages 321-341, December.
    2. Peter Warr, 2006. "The Gregory Thesis Visits the Tropics," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 82(257), pages 177-194, June.
    3. Boyd H. Hunter & Steven Kennedy & Nicholas Biddle, 2004. "Indigenous and Other Australian Poverty: Revisiting the Importance of Equivalence Scales," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 80(251), pages 411-422, December.
    4. Vanessa Rayner & James Bishop, 2013. "Industry Dimensions of the Resource Boom: An Input-Output Analysis," RBA Research Discussion Papers rdp2013-02, Reserve Bank of Australia.
    5. James G. MacKinnon, 2002. "Bootstrap inference in econometrics," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 35(4), pages 615-645, November.
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