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Food safety, the media, and the information market

Author

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  • Johan F. M. Swinnen
  • Jill McCluskey
  • Nathalie Francken

Abstract

Availability of information has increased rapidly over the past decades. Yet, information on food safety is still considered problematic. Economists have extensively researched the effects of imperfect information. However, little attention has been paid to the institutional organization of the supply of information and the incentive schemes in the information market. This paper analyzes how and when information is supplied by media organizations, and what the implications are. We first develop a theoretical framework and afterwards provide empirical evidence from media coverage of two recent food safety crises in Europe. Copyright 2005 International Association of Agricultural Economics.

Suggested Citation

  • Johan F. M. Swinnen & Jill McCluskey & Nathalie Francken, 2005. "Food safety, the media, and the information market," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 32(s1), pages 175-188, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:agecon:v:32:y:2005:i:s1:p:175-188
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Nord, Mark & Andrews, Margaret S. & Carlson, Steven, 2002. "Household Food Security In The United States, 2001," Food Assistance and Nutrition Research Reports 33865, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    2. Jolliffe, Dean & Tiehen, Laura & Gundersen, Craig & Winicki, Joshua, 2003. "FOOD STAMP BENEFITS AND CHILD POVERTY IN THE 1990s," Food Assistance and Nutrition Research Reports 33833, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
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    Cited by:

    1. Vigani, Mauro & Olper, Alessandro, 2013. "GMO standards, endogenous policy and the market for information," Food Policy, Elsevier, pages 32-43.
    2. Alessandro Olper & Johan Swinnen, 2013. "Mass Media and Public Policy: Global Evidence from Agricultural Policies," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 27(3), pages 413-436.
    3. Yan, Zhen & Yu, Xiaohua & Zhou, Jiehong, 2016. "Measure consumer preferences for pork attributes under different media coverage in China," Discussion Papers 232028, Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen, GlobalFood, Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development.
    4. Martin Browning & Lars Gårn Hansen & Sinne Smed, 2013. "Rational inattention or rational overreaction? Consumer reactions to health news," IFRO Working Paper 2013/14, University of Copenhagen, Department of Food and Resource Economics.
    5. Herrmann, Roland & Anders, Sven M. & Thompson, Stanley R., 2005. "Übermäßige Werbung und Marktsegmentierung durch staatliche Förderung der Regionalvermarktung: Eine theoretische Analyse," German Journal of Agricultural Economics, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Department for Agricultural Economics, vol. 54(3).
    6. Blasco, Andrea & Pin, Paolo & Sobbrio, Francesco, 2016. "Paying positive to go negative: Advertisers׳ competition and media reports," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 243-261.
    7. Dierks, Leef H., 2004. "Effects of Media Coverage on Demand," 84th Seminar, February 8-11, 2004, Zeist, The Netherlands 24992, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    8. Yan, Zhen & Zhou, Jie-hong, 2015. "Measuring consumer heterogeneous preferences for pork traits under media reports: choice experiment in sixteen traceability pilot cities, China," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 212609, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    9. Bitsch, Vera & Koković, Nevena & Rombach, Meike, 2014. "Risk Communication and Market Effects during Foodborne Illnesses: A Comparative Case Study of Bacterial Outbreaks in the U.S. and in Germany," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, International Food and Agribusiness Management Association (IFAMA), vol. 17(3).
    10. repec:oup:apecpp:v:39:y:2017:i:3:p:407-427. is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Pozo, Veronica F. & Schroeder, Ted C., 2016. "Evaluating the costs of meat and poultry recalls to food firms using stock returns," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 66-77.
    12. Yan, Zhen & Zhou, Jie-hong, 2015. "Measuring consumer heterogeneous preferences for pork traits under media reports: choice experiment in sixteen traceability pilot cities, China," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 211884, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    13. Nocella, Giuseppe & Stefani, Gianluca & Romano, Donato, 2011. "Preferences, trust and willingness to pay for food information: An analysis of the Italian Market," 2011 International Congress, August 30-September 2, 2011, Zurich, Switzerland 114606, European Association of Agricultural Economists.

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