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Estimating External Costs Of Municipal Landfill Siting Through Contingent Valuation Analysis: A Case Study


  • Roberts, Roland K.
  • Douglas, Peggy V.
  • Park, William M.


Much of the solid waste stream in the United States is generated by metropolitan areas, while associated landfills are often located in adjacent rural communities. Landfill disposal of municipal solid waste often creates external costs to nearby residents. Contingent valuation was used to estimate external costs of siting a landfill in the Carter community of Knox County, Tennessee. Estimates of annual external costs were $227 per household. Household income, size, years in the community, and distance from the proposed landfill and the respondent's education, sex, and perception of health risks were important in determining a household's willingness to pay to avoid having a landfill in the Carter community. Also, households whose drinking water supplies were at risk of contamination were willing to pay $141 more than those who used piped city water or bottled water.

Suggested Citation

  • Roberts, Roland K. & Douglas, Peggy V. & Park, William M., 1991. "Estimating External Costs Of Municipal Landfill Siting Through Contingent Valuation Analysis: A Case Study," Southern Journal of Agricultural Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 23(02), December.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:sojoae:30048

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Maler, Karl-Goran, 1977. "A note on the use of property values in estimating marginal willingness to pay for environmental quality," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 4(4), pages 355-369, December.
    2. Randall, Alan & Ives, Berry & Eastman, Clyde, 1974. "Bidding games for valuation of aesthetic environmental improvements," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 1(2), pages 132-149, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Thomas C. Kinnaman & Don Fullterton, 1999. "The Economics of Residential Solid Waste Management," NBER Working Papers 7326, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Carmelo J. León & Jorge E. Araña & Javier León & Matías M. González, 2016. "The Economic Benefits of Reducing the Environmental Effects of Landfills: Heterogeneous Distance Decay Effects," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 63(1), pages 193-218, January.
    3. Toshiaki Sasao, 2004. "Analysis of the socioeconomic impact of landfill siting considering regional factors," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 6(2), pages 147-175, June.
    4. Caplan, Arthur & Grijalva, Therese & Jackson-Smith, Douglas, 2007. "Using choice question formats to determine compensable values: The case of a landfill-siting process," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(4), pages 834-846, February.
    5. Barrett, Alan & Lawlor, John, 1995. "The Economics of Solid Waste Management in Ireland," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number PRS26.
    6. Soliño, Mario & Farizo, Begoña A. & Campos, Pablo, 2009. "The influence of home-site factors on residents' willingness to pay: An application for power generation from scrubland in Galicia, Spain," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(10), pages 4055-4065, October.
    7. Peter A. Groothuis & George Van Houtven & John C. Whitehead, 1998. "Using Contingent Valuation to Measure the Compensation Required to Gain Community Acceptance of a Lulu: the Case of a Hazardous Waste Disposal Facility," Public Finance Review, , vol. 26(3), pages 231-249, May.

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