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An Empirical Note on R&D Growth Models with Regional Implications

  • Saunoris, James W.
  • Payne, James E.

Using U.S. data from 1960 to 2007 this empirical note re-examines the semi-endogenous and Schumpeterian R&D growth models presented by Ha and Howitt (2007) and Madsen (2008). The empirical results support the Schumpeterian R&D growth model. Specifically, in the long-run increases in R&D expenditures are necessary to counteract lower R&D productiv-ity due to the presence of product proliferation. Furthermore, the study provides a frame-work for further investigation of R&D growth models at the regional level.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/132458
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Article provided by Mid-Continent Regional Science Association in its journal Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy.

Volume (Year): 41 (2011)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages:

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Handle: RePEc:ags:jrapmc:132458
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  1. Engle, Robert F. & Yoo, Byung Sam, 1987. "Forecasting and testing in co-integrated systems," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 143-159, May.
  2. Marios Zachariadis, 2003. "R&D, innovation, and technological progress: a test of the Schumpeterian framework without scale effects," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 36(3), pages 566-586, August.
  3. Christopher Laincz & Pietro Peretto, 2006. "Scale effects in endogenous growth theory: an error of aggregation not specification," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 11(3), pages 263-288, September.
  4. Marios Zachariadis, 2004. "R&D-induced Growth in the OECD?," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 8(3), pages 423-439, 08.
  5. Jakob B. Madsen & EPRU & FRU, 2007. "Semi-Endogenous Versus Schumpeterian Growth Models: Testing The Knowledge Production Function Using International Data," Monash Economics Working Papers 26-07, Monash University, Department of Economics.
  6. Altshuler, Rosanne, 1988. "A Dynamic Analysis of the Research and Experimentation Credit," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 41(4), pages 453-66, December.
  7. Jones, Charles I, 1995. "Time Series Tests of Endogenous Growth Models," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 110(2), pages 495-525, May.
  8. del Barrio-Castro, Tomas & Lopez-Bazo, Enrique & Serrano-Domingo, Guadalupe, 2002. "New evidence on international R&D spillovers, human capital and productivity in the OECD," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 77(1), pages 41-45, September.
  9. Robert M. Hunt & Leonard I. Nakamura, 2006. "The Democratization of U.S. Research and Development after 1980," 2006 Meeting Papers 121, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  10. Peretto, Pietro F., 1996. "Technological Change and Population Growth," Working Papers 96-28, Duke University, Department of Economics.
  11. Segerstrom, Paul S, 1998. "Endogenous Growth without Scale Effects," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(5), pages 1290-1310, December.
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