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Family Ties, Labor Mobility and Interresgional Wage Differentials


  • Cherry, Todd L.
  • Tsournos, Pete T.


The applied research reported here examines the impact of household structures on interregional wage disparities. While migration studies generally suggest that family ties deter labor mobility, there is no clear evidence whether the reduced mobility is reflected in interregional wage differentials. Using a two-step procedure, we examine the conjecture that diminished labor mobility from greater family ties increase inter-regional wage differentials. Results indicate that spatial wage dispersion is greater because of the presence of children, but wage disparities are not enhanced by marriage. Findings consequently suggest that decreased labor mobility from children is reflected in interregional wage differentials, but any restrictive effect on mobility from marriage is not observed in wage variation.

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  • Cherry, Todd L. & Tsournos, Pete T., 2001. "Family Ties, Labor Mobility and Interresgional Wage Differentials," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 31(1).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:jrapmc:132188

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Mincer, Jacob, 1978. "Family Migration Decisions," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 86(5), pages 749-773, October.
    2. Montgomery, Edward, 1992. "Evidence on metropolitan wage differences across industries and over time," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 69-83, January.
    3. Helwege, Jean, 1992. "Sectoral Shifts and Interindustry Wage Differentials," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 10(1), pages 55-84, January.
    4. Surendra Gera & Gilles Grenier, 1994. "Interindustry Wage Differentials and Efficiency Wages: Some Canadian Evidence," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 27(1), pages 81-100, February.
    5. Roback, Jennifer, 1988. "Wages, Rents, and Amenities: Differences among Workers and Regions," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 26(1), pages 23-41, January.
    6. Edin, Per-Anders & Zetterberg, Johnny, 1992. "Interindustry Wage Differentials: Evidence from Sweden and a Comparison with the United States," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(5), pages 1341-1349, December.
    7. Kennedy, Peter, 1986. "Interpreting Dummy Variables," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 68(1), pages 174-175, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Thomas J. Cooke, 2013. "All tied up: Tied staying and tied migration within the United States, 1997 to 2007," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 29(30), pages 817-836, October.
    2. repec:ejn:ejefjr:v:5:y:2017:i:2:p:73-83 is not listed on IDEAS

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    Labor and Human Capital;


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