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Drivers of Price and Nonprice Water Conservation by Urban and Rural Water Utilities: An Application of Predictive Models to Four Southern States

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Listed:
  • Boyer, Christopher N.
  • Adams, Damian C.
  • Borisova, Tatiana

Abstract

This study examines water system characteristics, managers’ attitudes and perceptions toward water conservation, and future planning strategies that influence the adoption of water conservation programs for urban and rural communities. We surveyed water system managers in Oklahoma, Arkansas, Tennessee, and Florida; and we parameterized predictive adoption models for price-based (PC) and nonprice-based (NPC) conservation programs. Notably, results suggest that information about the price elasticity of water demand for a community does encourage PC and NPC adoption; and we found no evidence that PC and NPC adoption is jointly considered by water systems.

Suggested Citation

  • Boyer, Christopher N. & Adams, Damian C. & Borisova, Tatiana, 2014. "Drivers of Price and Nonprice Water Conservation by Urban and Rural Water Utilities: An Application of Predictive Models to Four Southern States," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 46(01), February.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:joaaec:169000
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Wheeler, Erin & Golden, Bill & Johnson, Jeffrey & Peterson, Jeffrey, 2008. "Economic Efficiency of Short-Term Versus Long-Term Water Rights Buyouts," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 40(02), pages 493-501, August.
    2. Daniel Schunk, 2008. "A Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm for multiple imputation in large surveys," AStA Advances in Statistical Analysis, Springer;German Statistical Society, vol. 92(1), pages 101-114, February.
    3. Mullen, Jeffrey D., 2011. "Statewide Water Planning: The Georgia Experience," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 43(03), pages 357-366, August.
    4. Ding, Ya & Peterson, Jeffrey M., 2012. "Comparing the Cost-Effectiveness of Water Conservation Policies in a Depleting Aquifer: A Dynamic Analysis of the Kansas High Plains," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 44(02), pages 223-234, May.
    5. Jordan, Jeffrey L., 2008. "Evaluating Water Conservation Strategies and Policies," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 40(02), August.
    6. Christopher Boyer & Damian Adams & Tatiana Borisova & Christopher Clark, 2012. "Factors Driving Water Utility Rate Structure Choice: Evidence from Four Southern U.S. States," Water Resources Management: An International Journal, Published for the European Water Resources Association (EWRA), Springer;European Water Resources Association (EWRA), vol. 26(10), pages 2747-2760, August.
    7. Greg Halich & Kurt Stephenson, 2009. "Effectiveness of Residential Water-Use Restrictions under Varying Levels of Municipal Effort," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 85(4), pages 614-626.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    predictive models; southern US; water conservation; water system managers; Agribusiness; Land Economics/Use; Q24; Q30; Q50;

    JEL classification:

    • Q24 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Land
    • Q30 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation - - - General
    • Q50 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - General

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