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The Impact of Changes in Income Distribution on Current and Future Food Demand in Urban China

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  • Zheng, Zhihao
  • Henneberry, Shida Rastegari

Abstract

The impact of changes in income distribution on food demand in the urban Jiangsu province of China is estimated in this study. Findings suggest that changes in income distribution have a considerable impact on the demand for individual food commodity groups. Therefore, given that a significant change in income distribution has occurred in urban China, food demand projections should account for expected changes in future income distribution.

Suggested Citation

  • Zheng, Zhihao & Henneberry, Shida Rastegari, 2010. "The Impact of Changes in Income Distribution on Current and Future Food Demand in Urban China," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 0(Number 1), pages 1-21.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:jlaare:61058
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/61058/files/JARE_Apr2010__04_pp51-71.pdf
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Jing You & Katsushi S. Imai & Raghav Gaiha, 2014. "Decoding the Growth-Nutrition Nexus in China: Inequality, Uncertainty and Food Insecurity," Discussion Paper Series DP2014-28, Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration, Kobe University, revised Dec 2014.
    2. Rieger, Jorg & Kuhlgatz, Christian, 2015. "Analyzing Consumer Demand During A Food Scandal: The Case of Dioxin Contaminated Feed in Germany And The Media," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 212197, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    3. Kang Ernest Liu & Hung-Hao Chang & Wen S. Chern, 2011. "Examining changes in fresh fruit and vegetable consumption over time and across regions in urban China," China Agricultural Economic Review, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 3(3), pages 276-296, September.
    4. Kuhlgatz, Christian H. & Huang, Jiaqi & Antonides, Gerrit & Nie, Fengying, 2018. "The Effect of Food Prices and Own-produced Food on Food Security of Chinese Rural Households," 2018 Annual Meeting, August 5-7, Washington, D.C. 273988, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    5. Zheng, Zhihao & Henneberry, Shida Rastegari, 2012. "Estimating the impacts of rising food prices on nutrient intake in urban China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 1090-1103.
    6. Rieger, Jörg & Kuhlgatz, Christian & Anders, Sven, 2016. "Food scandals, media attention and habit persistence among desensitised meat consumers," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 82-92.
    7. You, Jing & Imai, Katsushi S. & Gaiha, Raghav, 2016. "Declining Nutrient Intake in a Growing China: Does Household Heterogeneity Matter?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 171-191.
    8. Ortega, David L. & Wang, H. Holly & Wu, Laping & Hong, Soo Jeong, 2015. "Retail channel and consumer demand for food quality in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 359-366.
    9. Jing You, 2014. "Dietary change, nutrient transition and food security in fast-growing China," Chapters,in: Handbook on Food, chapter 9, pages 204-245 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    10. Michael Savage, 2016. "Indirect tax reform and the specification of demand: the case of Ireland," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer;International Institute of Public Finance, vol. 23(2), pages 368-399, April.
    11. Tomoki Fujii, 2014. "Is urban food demand in the Philippines different from China?," Working Papers 18-2014, Singapore Management University, School of Economics.
    12. Javier García-Enríquez & Cruz A. Echevarría, 2016. "Consistent Estimation of a Censored Demand System and Welfare Analysis: The 2012 VAT Reform in Spain," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 67(2), pages 324-347, June.

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