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Residential Broadband Availability: Evidence from Kentucky and North Carolina

  • Renkow, Mitch
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    I analyze the determinants of county-level broadband availability to gauge the extent to which the rural-urban broadband gap has narrowed and the factors that underlie that narrowing. Using data that have been collected by organizations tracking and promoting broadband in Kentucky and North Carolina, I find that in both states the rural-urban availability gap has indeed narrowed substantially, although there appears to be a limit on the extent to which broadband service will extend into the least densely populated counties. Among rural counties, availability rates increase systematically with the size of the county’s urbanized population.

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    Article provided by Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association in its journal Agricultural and Resource Economics Review.

    Volume (Year): 40 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 2 (August)

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    Handle: RePEc:ags:arerjl:117768
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    1. Bronwyn H. Hall & Beethika Khan, 2004. "Adoption of New Technology," Development and Comp Systems 0401001, EconWPA.
    2. James E. Prieger, 2003. "The Supply Side of the Digital Divide: Is There Equal Availability in the Broadband Internet Access Market?," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 41(2), pages 346-363, April.
    3. Flamm, Kenneth & Chaudhuri, Anindya, 0. "An analysis of the determinants of broadband access," Telecommunications Policy, Elsevier, vol. 31(6-7), pages 312-326, July.
    4. David Shideler & Narine Badasyan & Laura Taylor, 2007. "The economic impact of broadband deployment in Kentucky," Regional Economic Development, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Nov, pages 88-118.
    5. Brian Whitacre, 2008. "Factors influencing the temporal diffusion of broadband adoption: evidence from Oklahoma," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer, vol. 42(3), pages 661-679, September.
    6. Bradford F. Mills & Brian E. Whitacre, 2003. "Understanding the Non-Metropolitan-Metropolitan Digital Divide," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 34(2), pages 219-243.
    7. Wood, Lawrence E., 2008. "Rural broadband: The provider matters," Telecommunications Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(5), pages 326-339, June.
    8. Brian E. Whitacre & Bradford F. Mills, 2007. "Infrastructure and the Rural—urban Divide in High-speed Residential Internet Access," International Regional Science Review, , vol. 30(3), pages 249-273, July.
    9. Whitacre, Brian E., 2008. "Factors Influencing the Temporal Diffusion of Broadband Adoption: Evidence from Oklahoma," 2008 Annual Meeting, February 2-6, 2008, Dallas, Texas 6934, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
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