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On the balance between strategic-basic and applied agricultural research


  • Pannell, David J.


Strategic‐basic research refers to basic research conducted in strategically selected areas expected to be of social benefit. Recent literature on the processes of basic research and its links to applied research has not been widely discussed in relation to agricultural research. This may have important implications for the question of the optimal allocation of research resources. The links are reviewed and combined into a framework for considering the allocation question. A numerical model suggests that only a small number of the model’s parameters substantially affect the optimal level of basic research, and that it is not important to identify the optimal solution precisely, since the benefit function is extremely flat around the optimum.

Suggested Citation

  • Pannell, David J., 1999. "On the balance between strategic-basic and applied agricultural research," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 43(1), March.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aareaj:117033

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Adams, James D, 1990. "Fundamental Stocks of Knowledge and Productivity Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(4), pages 673-702, August.
    2. D. Schimmelpfennig & C. Thirtle, 1994. "Cointegration, And Causality: Exploring The Relationship Between Agricultural And Productivity," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45(2), pages 220-231.
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    Cited by:

    1. Malla, Stavroula & Gray, Richard S., 2002. "Crop Research Incentives in a Privatized Industry: A Stochastic Approach," 2002 International Congress, August 28-31, 2002, Zaragoza, Spain 24936, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    2. Mullen, John D., 2007. "Productivity growth and the returns from public investment in R&D in Australian broadacre agriculture," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 51(4), December.
    3. Brethour, Cher & Weersink, Alfons, 2003. "Rolling the dice: on-farm benefits of research into reducing pesticide use," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 76(2), pages 575-587, May.
    4. Marshall, Graham R. & Brennan, John P., 2001. "Issues in benefit-cost analysis of agricultural research projects," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 45(2), June.
    5. Pannell, D. J., 1999. "On the estimation of on-farm benefits of agricultural research," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 61(2), pages 123-134, August.
    6. Malla, Stavroula & Gray, Richard S., 2001. "An Analytical And Empirical Analysis Of The Private Biotech R&D Incentives," 2001 Annual meeting, August 5-8, Chicago, IL 20544, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).

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