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Energy Efficiency and Capital Embodied Technical Change: The Case of Mexican Cement Manufacturing

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Abstract

This paper analyses energy efficiency in the Mexican cement industry by studying disaggregated data at the plant and production unit level. A short-run production function is examined to look at the substitution possibilities between labour and energy with given equipment, but these are found to be limited (as expected). Instead, reduction of energy use per unit of output is mainly due to capital embodied technical progress: the most important improvements in plant efficiency are related to investments in new pieces of specific equipment. Average energy intensity of the branch as a whole is, therefore, mainly explained by capacity expansion. Finally, the importance of factor prices and the relevance of our results to other industries are discussed.

Suggested Citation

  • Thomas Sterner, 1990. "Energy Efficiency and Capital Embodied Technical Change: The Case of Mexican Cement Manufacturing," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 2), pages 155-167.
  • Handle: RePEc:aen:journl:1990v11-02-a09
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    Cited by:

    1. Popp, David C., 2001. "The effect of new technology on energy consumption," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 215-239, July.
    2. Popp, David & Newell, Richard G. & Jaffe, Adam B., 2010. "Energy, the Environment, and Technological Change," Handbook of the Economics of Innovation, Elsevier.
    3. Popp, David, 2005. "Lessons from patents: Using patents to measure technological change in environmental models," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(2-3), pages 209-226, August.
    4. Khanna, Madhu & Zilberman, David, 1997. "Incentives, precision technology and environmental protection," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(1), pages 25-43, October.
    5. Bacon, Robert, 1992. "Measuring the possibilities of interfuel substitution," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1031, The World Bank.
    6. Zhang, Chi & May, Michael M. & Heller, Thomas C., 2001. "Impact on global warming of development and structural changes in the electricity sector of Guangdong Province, China," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 179-203, February.
    7. Lennox, James A. & Witajewski-Baltvilks, Jan, 2017. "Directed technical change with capital-embodied technologies: Implications for climate policy," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 400-409.
    8. Okay, Nesrin & Konukman, Alp Er S. & Akman, Ugur, 2009. "Analysis of Innovation and Energy Profiles in the Turkish Manufacturing Sector," MPRA Paper 16344, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Okay, Nesrin & Akman, Ugur, 2010. "Analysis of ESCO activities using country indicators," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 14(9), pages 2760-2771, December.
    10. David Popp, 2003. "Lessons from Patents: Using Patents To Measure Technological Change in Environmental Models," NBER Working Papers 9978, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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    JEL classification:

    • F0 - International Economics - - General

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