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A Review of Peter Temin's The Roman Market Economy

Author

Listed:
  • François Velde

Abstract

Herein, I review Peter Temin's book, "The Roman Market Economy", and take the occasion to alert economists to the exciting work that is being done and could be done in the economic history of the ancient world. (JEL C80, N01, N13, N73)

Suggested Citation

  • François Velde, 2014. "A Review of Peter Temin's The Roman Market Economy," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 52(4), pages 1151-1159, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:jeclit:v:52:y:2014:i:4:p:1151-59
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/jel.52.4.1151
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Peter Temin, 2001. "A Market Economy in the Early Roman Empire," Oxford Economic and Social History Working Papers _039, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    2. David Kessler & Peter Temin, 2007. "The organization of the grain trade in the early Roman Empire," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 60(2), pages 313-332, May.
    3. Peter Temin, 2001. "A Market Economy in the Early Roman Empire," Economics Series Working Papers 2001-W39, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C80 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - General
    • N01 - Economic History - - General - - - Development of the Discipline: Historiographical; Sources and Methods
    • N13 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations - - - Europe: Pre-1913
    • N73 - Economic History - - Economic History: Transport, International and Domestic Trade, Energy, and Other Services - - - Europe: Pre-1913

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