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Financial Regulation: Lessons from the Recent Financial Crises


  • Takeo Hoshi


The experiences of the financial crises in the United States recently and in Japan in the 1990s suggest two lessons for future financial regulations. First, the lack of an orderly resolution mechanism for large and complex financial institutions created serious problems. Second, it is important to distinguish between individual financial institutions' health and stability of the whole financial system. Policy recommendations in the Squam Lake Report address these issues well. The Dodd-Frank Act could provide an effective regulatory framework to implement these recommendations, but the success depends on the details of the regulations that have not been specified. (JEL E44, E52, G01, G21, G28, L51)

Suggested Citation

  • Takeo Hoshi, 2011. "Financial Regulation: Lessons from the Recent Financial Crises," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 49(1), pages 120-128, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:jeclit:v:49:y:2011:i:1:p:120-28 Note: DOI: 10.1257/jel.49.1.120

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Carmen M. Reinhart & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 2009. "Varieties of Crises and Their Dates," Introductory Chapters,in: This Time Is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly Princeton University Press.
    2. Reinhart, Karmen & Rogoff, Kenneth, 2009. ""This time is different": panorama of eight centuries of financial crises," Economic Policy, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration, vol. 1, pages 77-114, March.
    3. Gorton, Gary B., 2010. "Slapped by the Invisible Hand: The Panic of 2007," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199734153, June.
    4. Hori, Masahiro, 2005. "Does bank liquidation affect client firm performance? Evidence from a bank failure in Japan," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 88(3), pages 415-420, September.
    5. Kenneth R. French & Martin N. Baily & John Y. Campbell & John H. Cochrane & Douglas W. Diamond & Darrell Duffie & Anil K Kashyap & Frederic S. Mishkin & Raghuram G. Rajan & David S. Scharfstein & Robe, 2010. "The Squam Lake Report: Fixing the Financial System," Economics Books, Princeton University Press, edition 1, number 9261.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:col:000442:015646 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. KAWASHIMA, Toshiki & NAKABAYASHI, Masaki, 2014. "Structural Disposal and Cyclical Adjustment: Non-performing Loans, Structural Transition, and Regulatory Reform in Japan, 1997-2011," ISS Discussion Paper Series (series F) f167, Institute of Social Science, The University of Tokyo, revised 14 Jul 2016.
    3. Szymon OkoĊ„, 2012. "New Approach to Remuneration Policy for Investment Firms: a Polish Capital Market Perspective," Contemporary Economics, University of Finance and Management in Warsaw, vol. 6(1), March.
    4. Nahil Boussiga & Ezzeddine Abaoub, 2015. "How Does Government Policy Affect Equity Risk Premium?," Journal of Applied Management and Investments, Department of Business Administration and Corporate Security, International Humanitarian University, vol. 4(2), pages 65-75.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • L51 - Industrial Organization - - Regulation and Industrial Policy - - - Economics of Regulation


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