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What Do Consumers Really Pay on Their Checking and Credit Card Accounts? Explicit, Implicit, and Avoidable Costs

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  • Victor Stango
  • Jonathan Zinman

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Victor Stango & Jonathan Zinman, 2009. "What Do Consumers Really Pay on Their Checking and Credit Card Accounts? Explicit, Implicit, and Avoidable Costs," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(2), pages 424-429, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:99:y:2009:i:2:p:424-29
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/aer.99.2.424
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Christopher D. Carroll, 2001. "A Theory of the Consumption Function, with and without Liquidity Constraints," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 15(3), pages 23-45, Summer.
    2. Xavier Gabaix & David Laibson, 2006. "Shrouded Attributes, Consumer Myopia, and Information Suppression in Competitive Markets," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 121(2), pages 505-540.
    3. Stefano DellaVigna & Ulrike Malmendier, 2004. "Contract Design and Self-Control: Theory and Evidence," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 119(2), pages 353-402.
    4. Jonathan Zinman, 2009. "Where Is The Missing Credit Card Debt? Clues And Implications," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 55(2), pages 249-265, June.
    5. Agarwal, Sumit & Chomsisengphet, Souphala & Liu, Chunlin & Souleles, Nicholas S., 2005. "Do consumers choose the right credit contracts?," CFS Working Paper Series 2005/32, Center for Financial Studies (CFS).
    6. David B. Gross & Nicholas S. Souleles, 2002. "Do Liquidity Constraints and Interest Rates Matter for Consumer Behavior? Evidence from Credit Card Data," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 117(1), pages 149-185.
    7. Sumit Agarwal & John C Driscoll & Xavier Gabaix & David Laibson, 2008. "Learning in the Credit Card Market," Levine's Working Paper Archive 122247000000002028, David K. Levine.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Adams, Robert M., 2017. "Bank Fees, Aftermarkets, and Consumer Behavior," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2017-054, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    2. Mark Armstrong & John Vickers, 2012. "Consumer Protection and Contingent Charges," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 50(2), pages 477-493, June.
    3. Victor Stango & Jonathan Zinman, 2011. "Limited and varying consumer attention: evidence from shocks to the salience of bank overdraft fees," Working Papers 11-17, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
    4. Alejandro Ponce & Enrique Seira & Guillermo Zamarripa, 2017. "Borrowing on the Wrong Credit Card? Evidence from Mexico," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 107(4), pages 1335-1361, April.
    5. Kim Huynh & Philipp Schmidt-Dengler & Gregor W. Smith & Angelika Welte, 2017. "Adoption Costs of Financial Innovation: Evidence from Italian ATM Cards," Staff Working Papers 17-8, Bank of Canada.
    6. John Ashton & Andros Gregoriou, 2014. "The role of implicit costs and product quality in determining the customer costs of using personal current accounts," Working Papers 14001, Bangor Business School, Prifysgol Bangor University (Cymru / Wales).
    7. Michael D. Grubb, 2015. "Overconfident Consumers in the Marketplace," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 29(4), pages 9-36, Fall.
    8. Russ Kashian & Richard McGregory & Robert Drago, 2016. "ATM Fees at Black and Hispanic Owned Single Market Banks: A Comparative Analysis," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 43(1), pages 69-84, March.
    9. Lührmann, Melanie & Serra-Garcia, Marta & Winter, Joachim, 2015. "Teaching teenagers in finance: Does it work?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 160-174.
    10. repec:kap:jproda:v:48:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s11123-017-0510-x is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Schuh, Scott, 2017. "Measuring consumer expenditures with payment diaries," Working Papers 17-2, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    12. Paola Bongini & Luca Colombo & Malgorzata Iwanicz-Drozdowska, 2015. "Financial Literacy: Where Do We Stand?," Journal of Financial Management, Markets and Institutions, Società editrice il Mulino, issue 1, pages 3-12, June.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D14 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Saving; Personal Finance
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

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