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The Revealed Preferences of Political Action Committees

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  • Poole, Keith T
  • Romer, Thomas
  • Rosenthal, Howard

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  • Poole, Keith T & Romer, Thomas & Rosenthal, Howard, 1987. "The Revealed Preferences of Political Action Committees," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 77(2), pages 298-302, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:77:y:1987:i:2:p:298-302
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    Cited by:

    1. Potters, Jan & Sloof, Randolph, 1996. "Interest groups: A survey of empirical models that try to assess their influence," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 12(3), pages 403-442, November.
    2. Michael M. Bechtel & Roland Füss, 2010. "Capitalizing on Partisan Politics? The Political Economy of Sector-Specific Redistribution in Germany," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 42(2-3), pages 203-235, March.
    3. Kroszner, Randall S & Stratmann, Thomas, 2005. "Corporate Campaign Contributions, Repeat Giving, and the Rewards to Legislator Reputation," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 48(1), pages 41-71, April.
    4. Ansolabehere, Stephen & De Figueiredo, John M. & Snyder, James M., 2003. "Are Campaign Contributions Investment in the Political Marketplace or Individual Consumption? Or "Why Is There So Little Money in Politics?"," Working papers 4272-02, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Sloan School of Management.
    5. Bombardini, Matilde & Trebbi, Francesco, 2011. "Votes or money? Theory and evidence from the US Congress," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(7-8), pages 587-611, August.
    6. Che, Yeon-Koo & Gale, Ian L, 1998. "Caps on Political Lobbying," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(3), pages 643-651, June.
    7. Craig A. Bond & Dana L. Hoag & Jennifer Freeborn, 2011. "Are Agricultural PACs Monolithic? An Empirical Investigation of Political Contributions from Agricultural Subsectors," American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 70(1), pages 210-237, January.
    8. Randall S. Kroszner & Thomas Stratmann, 1999. "Does Political Ambiguity Pay? Corporate Campaign contributions and the Rewards to Legislator Reputation," University of Chicago - George G. Stigler Center for Study of Economy and State 155, Chicago - Center for Study of Economy and State.
    9. Battaglini, Marco & Patacchini, Eleonora, 2016. "Influencing Connected Legislators," CEPR Discussion Papers 11571, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    10. Michael Munger, 1989. "A simple test of the thesis that committee jurisdictions shape corporate PAC contributions," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 62(2), pages 181-186, August.
    11. Peter Grajzl & Peter Murrell, 2006. "Lawyers and politicians: the impact of organized legal professions on institutional reforms," Constitutional Political Economy, Springer, vol. 17(4), pages 251-276, December.
    12. Stratmann, Thomas, 1998. "The Market for Congressional Votes: Is Timing of Contributions Everything?," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 41(1), pages 85-113, April.
    13. Peter Grajzl & Peter Murrell, 2009. "Fostering civil society to build institutions," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 17(1), pages 1-41, January.

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