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War, Inflation, and Social Capital

Author

Listed:
  • Sergei Guriev
  • Nikita Melnikov

Abstract

We use weekly data from 79 Russian regions to measure the impact of economic shocks and proximity to war in Ukraine on social capital in Russian regions. We proxy social capital by the relative intensity of internet searches for the most salient dimensions of pro-social behavior such as "donate blood", "charity", "adopt a child" etc. This measure of social capital is correlated with a survey-based measure of generalized social trust. Our search-based measure of social capital responds negatively to the spikes of inflation and positively to the intensity of the conflict in Ukraine (controlling for region and week fixed effects).

Suggested Citation

  • Sergei Guriev & Nikita Melnikov, 2016. "War, Inflation, and Social Capital," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(5), pages 230-235, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:106:y:2016:i:5:p:230-35
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/aer.p20161067
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    Cited by:

    1. Geraci, Andrea & Nardotto, Mattia & Reggiani, Tommaso & Sabatini, Fabio, 2022. "Broadband Internet and social capital," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 206(C).
    2. Osiichuk, Maryna & Shepotylo, Oleksandr, 2020. "Conflict and well-being of civilians: The case of the Russian-Ukrainian hybrid war," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 44(1).
    3. Hasan, Iftekhar & He, Qing & Lu, Haitian, 2020. "The impact of social capital on economic attitudes and outcomes," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 108(C).
    4. Inés Berniell & Yarine Fawaz & Anne Laferrère & Pedro Mira & Elizaveta Pronkina, 2021. "The COVID-19 Curtain: Can Past Communist Regimes Explain the Vaccination Divide in Europe," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0291, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
    5. Jarko Fidrmuc & Serhiy Moroz & Fabian Reck, 2021. "Regional risk-sharing in Ukraine," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 48(3), pages 645-660, August.
    6. Argentiero, Amedeo & Cerqueti, Roy & Sabatini, Fabio, 2021. "Does social capital explain the Solow residual? A DSGE approach," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 35-53.
    7. Shteryo Nozharov, 2019. "Hybrid Threats As An Exogenous Economic Shock," Economic Archive, D. A. Tsenov Academy of Economics, Svishtov, Bulgaria, issue 4 Year 20, pages 21-29.
    8. Berniell, Maria Ines & Fawaz, Yarine & Laferrere, Anne & Mira, Pedro & Pronkina, Elizaveta, 2021. "The COVID-19 Curtain: Can Past Communist Regimes Explain the Vaccination Divide in Europe?," IZA Discussion Papers 14833, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    9. Egorov, Georgy & Enikolopov, Ruben & Makarin, Alexey & Petrova, Maria, 2021. "Divided we stay home: Social distancing and ethnic diversity," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 194(C).
    10. Lidwina Gundacker & Jarko Fidrmuc, 2017. "Oligarchs and social capital in Russian regions: a quantitative assessment," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 44(3), pages 509-527, August.
    11. Imane Ouadghiri & Mathieu Gomes & Jonathan Peillex & Guillaume Pijourlet, 2022. "Investor Attention to the Fossil Fuel Divestment Movement and Stock Returns," Post-Print hal-03549713, HAL.
    12. Gokmen, Gunes & Yakovlev, Evgeny, 2018. "War and well-being in transition: Evidence from two natural experiments," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(3), pages 788-799.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior
    • D74 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Conflict; Conflict Resolution; Alliances; Revolutions
    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • P24 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - National Income, Product, and Expenditure; Money; Inflation
    • P25 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Urban, Rural, and Regional Economics
    • P36 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Institutions and Their Transitions - - - Consumer Economics; Health; Education and Training; Welfare, Income, Wealth, and Poverty
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification

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