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Does Work-Time Flexibility Really Improve the Reconciliation of Family and Work?

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  • Scheffel, Juliane

Abstract

Temporal work flexibility is often viewed as means to improve the reconciliation of family and work. By exploiting theGerman re-unification and the particularities of the labor market of the German Democratic Republic, I show that flexitime allows mothers to spend more time with their children. The additional childcare time is added to the already existing work burden. It is accommodated by reductions in regenerative time and leisure which makes a reconciliation of family and work even more strenuous. A comparison between East andWest suggests a significantly positive endogeneity bias that largely overstates the effectiveness of work-time flexibility on parental time. --

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Paper provided by Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association in its series Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order with number 79992.

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Date of creation: 2013
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Handle: RePEc:zbw:vfsc13:79992

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  8. Ondrich, Jan & Spiess, C Katharina & Yang, Qing, 1996. "Barefoot and in a German Kitchen: Federal Parental Leave and Benefit Policy and the Return to Work after Childbirth in Germany," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 9(3), pages 247-66, August.
  9. Jonathan Guryan & Erik Hurst & Melissa Schettini Kearney, 2008. "Parental Education and Parental Time With Children," NBER Working Papers 13993, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Kalenkoski, Charlene M. & Pabilonia, Sabrina Wulff, 2009. "Time to Work or Time to Play: The Effect of Student Employment on Homework, Sleep, and Screen Time," IZA Discussion Papers 4666, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  11. Euwals, Rob, 2001. "Female Labour Supply, Flexibility of Working Hours, and Job Mobility," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 111(471), pages C120-34, May.
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