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Female Labour Supply, Flexibility of Working Hours, and Job Mobility

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  • Euwals, Rob
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    Abstract

    Traditional labour supply models do not address to what extent working hours are constrained within jobs, and to what extent working hours can be adjusted by means of changing employer. This paper measures the flexibility of working hours within and between jobs by relating subjective information on individual preferences to adjustments in working hours. Empirical analysis based on a sample of employed women in the Dutch Socio-Economic Panel (1987-89) shows that the flexibility of working hours within jobs is low.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Royal Economic Society in its journal The Economic Journal.

    Volume (Year): 111 (2001)
    Issue (Month): 471 (May)
    Pages: C120-34

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    Handle: RePEc:ecj:econjl:v:111:y:2001:i:471:p:c120-34

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    Cited by:
    1. Buddelmeyer, Hielke & Mourre, Gilles & Ward-Warmedinger, Melanie E., 2005. "Part-Time Work in EU Countries: Labour Market Mobility, Entry and Exit," IZA Discussion Papers 1550, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. repec:dgr:uvatin:2006017 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Alan Manning & Barbara Petrongolo, 2005. "The part-time pay penalty," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 3661, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    4. Sergei Scherbov & Warren C. Sanderson & Marija Mamolo, 2014. "Quantifying policy tradeoffs to support aging populations," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 30(20), pages 579-608, March.
    5. Martinez-Granado, Maite, 2005. "Testing labour supply and hours constraints," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(3), pages 321-343, June.
    6. Keisuke Kawata, 2013. "Work Hour Mismatch and On-the-job Search," IDEC DP2 Series 3-6, Hiroshima University, Graduate School for International Development and Cooperation (IDEC).
    7. Richard Blundell & Mike Brewer & Marco Francesconi, 2008. "Job Changes and Hours Changes: Understanding the Path of Labor Supply Adjustment," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 26(3), pages 421-453, 07.
    8. Verheul, I. & Carree, M.A. & Thurik, A.R., 2005. "Allocation and Productivity of Time in New Ventures of Female and Male Entrepreneurs," ERIM Report Series Research in Management 7178, Erasmus Research Institute of Management (ERIM), ERIM is the joint research institute of the Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University and the Erasmus School of Economics (ESE) at Erasmus Uni.
    9. Rob Euwals, 2010. "The Predictive Value of Subjective Labour Supply Data: A Dynamic Panel Data Model with Measurement Error," Working Papers id:2762, eSocialSciences.
    10. Mark L Bryan, 2007. "Workers, Workplaces and Working Hours," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 45(4), pages 735-759, December.
    11. Euwals, Rob, 2002. "The Predictive Value of Subjective Labour Supply Data: A Dynamic Panel Data Model with Measurement Error," CEPR Discussion Papers 3121, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    12. Keith A. Bender & John Douglas Satun, 2009. "Constrained By Hours And Restricted In Wages: The Quality Of Matches In The Labor Market," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 47(3), pages 512-529, 07.
    13. Bart Loog & Thomas Dohmen & Maarten Vendrik, 2013. "The Scope for Increasing Total Hours Worked," De Economist, Springer, vol. 161(2), pages 157-174, June.
    14. Rob Euwals, 2002. "The Predictive Value of Subjective Labour Supply Data: A Dynamic Panel Data Model with Measurement Error," 10th International Conference on Panel Data, Berlin, July 5-6, 2002 D1-3, International Conferences on Panel Data.
    15. Catherine SMITH, 2014. "Did the Intergenerational Solidarity Pact increase the employment rate of the elderly in Belgium? A macro-econometric evaluation," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2014009, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
    16. Scheffel, Juliane, 2013. "Does Work-Time Flexibility Really Improve the Reconciliation of Family and Work?," Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 79992, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    17. Euwals, Rob, 2001. "The Predictive Value of Subjective Labour Supply Data: A Dynamic Panel Data Model with Measurement Error," IZA Discussion Papers 400, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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