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Persistence in health limitations: a European comparative analysis

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  • Cristina Hernández-Quevedo
  • Andrew M. Jones
  • Nigel Rice

Abstract

This paper investigates the persistence in health limitations for individuals within the member states of the European Union. We use the full 8 waves of data available in the European Community Household Panel (ECHP) to explore the relative contributions of state dependence, unobserved heterogeneity and socioeconomic characteristics, in particular income, education and activity status, and how these vary across countries. We focus on binary measures of health limitations, constructed from the answers to the question: “Are you hampered in your daily activities by any physical or mental health problem, illness or disability?”. Dynamic non-linear panel data models are specified and estimated using both pooled and random effects probit and logit models together with complementary log-log models. The random effects probit specifications are preferred. Results reveal high state dependence of health limitations which remains after controlling for measures of socioeconomic status. There is heterogeneity in the socioeconomic gradient across countries.

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Paper provided by HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York in its series Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers with number 07/03.

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Date of creation: Mar 2007
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Handle: RePEc:yor:hectdg:07/03

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Web page: http://www.york.ac.uk/economics/postgrad/herc/hedg/
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Keywords: health limitations; dynamic models; panel data;

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Hernández Quevedo, C & Jiménez Rubio, D, 2008. "A comparison of the health status and health care utilisation patterns between foreigners and the national population in Spain: new evidence from the Spanish National Health Survey," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 08/22, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
  2. Allanson, Paul & Petrie, Dennis & Gerdtham, Ulf-G, 2008. "Longitudinal analysis of income-related health inequality," SIRE Discussion Papers 2008-38, Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE).
  3. Christelis, Dimitris & Sanz-de-Galdeano, Anna, 2011. "Smoking persistence across countries: A panel data analysis," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 1077-1093.
  4. Costa-Font, Joan & Hernández-Quevedo, Cristina & Jiménez-Rubio, Dolores, 2014. "Income inequalities in unhealthy life styles in England and Spain," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 13(C), pages 66-75.
  5. Slade, Alexander N., 2012. "Health investment decisions in response to diabetes information in older Americans," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 502-520.
  6. Cristina Hernández-Quevedo & Cristina Masseria, 2013. "Measuring income-related inequalities in health in multi-country analysis," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 53576, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  7. Costa-Font, Joan & Hernández-Quevedo, Cristina, 2012. "Measuring inequalities in health: What do we know? What do we need to know?," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 106(2), pages 195-206.
  8. Malo, Miguel A. & Sanchez-sanchez, Nuria, 2011. "The legal form of labour conflicts and their time persistence: an empirical analysis with a large firms' panel," MPRA Paper 30117, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  9. Fiorillo, Damiano, 2013. "Friends and health of the workers in Italy," MPRA Paper 44270, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  10. Hernández-Quevedo, Cristina & Masseria, Cristina, 2013. "Measuring Income-Related Inequalities in Health in Multi-Country Analysis/Midiendo las desigualdades en salud relacionadas con la renta entre países," Estudios de Economía Aplicada, Estudios de Economía Aplicada, vol. 31, pages 455-476, Septiembr.
  11. Dávila Quintana, C. Delia & Malo, Miguel A., 2012. "Poverty dynamics and disability: An empirical exercise using the European community household panel," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 41(4), pages 350-359.
  12. R Nakamura & L Siciliani, 2010. "Education and Body Mass Index: Evidence from ECHP," Discussion Papers 10/04, Department of Economics, University of York.
  13. Pascual Sáez, Marta & Cantarero Prieto, David, 2007. "Características socio-económicas de las personas con discapacidad en España: un estudio empírico/Socio-Economic Characteristics of People with Disabilities in Spain: an Empirical Study," Estudios de Economía Aplicada, Estudios de Economía Aplicada, vol. 25, pages 817 - 23 pÃ, Diciembre.
  14. Costa Font, Joan & Hernández-Quevedo, Cristina & McGuire, Alistair, 2011. "Persistence despite action? Measuring the patterns of health inequality in England (1997–2007)," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 103(2), pages 149-159.
  15. Joan Costa-i-Font & Cristina Hernandez-Quevedo & Azusa Sato, 2013. "A 'Health Kuznets' Curve'? Cross-Country and Longitudinal Evidence," CESifo Working Paper Series 4446, CESifo Group Munich.

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