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On the empirical association between poor health and low socioeconomic status at old age

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  • Christian Salas

    (Health Services Management Centre, University of Birmingham, UK)

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    Abstract

    Epidemiologic studies using mortality rates as indicators of health fail to find any meaningful association between poor health and low socioeconomic status in older age-groups, whereas economic studies using self-assessed health consistently find a significant positive correlation, even after controlling for self-reporting errors. Such contradictory results have not been reported for working age individuals. A simple explanation might be that the elderly samples on which the epidemiologic and economic studies are based come from different populations. However, this paper shows that similar contradictory results are obtained even when the same samples are used, simply by switching between self-assessed health and mortality as health indicators. An alternative explanation is proposed, namely that these health indicators yield different results because they relate to different ranges of the latent health variable at old age. Copyright © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/hec.663
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Health Economics.

    Volume (Year): 11 (2002)
    Issue (Month): 3 ()
    Pages: 207-220

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    Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:11:y:2002:i:3:p:207-220

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    Web page: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5749

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    1. Sickles, Robin C & Taubman, Paul, 1986. "An Analysis of the Health and Retirement Status of the Elderly," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 54(6), pages 1339-56, November.
    2. Grossman, Michael, 1972. "On the Concept of Health Capital and the Demand for Health," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 80(2), pages 223-55, March-Apr.
    3. Ettner, Susan L., 1996. "New evidence on the relationship between income and health," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 67-85, February.
    4. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
    5. Kenkel, D.S., 1989. "Should You Eat Breakfast? Estimates From Health Production Functions," Papers 9-90-8, Pennsylvania State - Department of Economics.
    6. Haynes, Robin, 1991. "Inequalities in health and health service use: Evidence from the general household survey," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 361-368, January.
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    Cited by:
    1. Olga Kiuila & Peter Mieszkowski, 2007. "The effects of income, education and age on health," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(8), pages 781-798.
    2. Ianina Rossi & Fernanda Tellechea & Fiorella Tramontin & Patricia Triunfo, 2007. "El estado de salud de los uruguayos," Estudios de Economia, University of Chile, Department of Economics, vol. 34(1 Year 20), pages 73-96, June.
    3. Elisabetta Santarelli & Anna De Pascale, . "Economic, housing conditions and health of old people in Italy: evidence from EU-SILC," Working Papers 99/12, Sapienza University of Rome, Metodi e modelli per l'economia, il territorio e la finanza MEMOTEF.
    4. Costa-Font, Joan & Hernández-Quevedo, Cristina, 2012. "Measuring inequalities in health: What do we know? What do we need to know?," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 106(2), pages 195-206.
    5. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:9:y:2005:i:9:p:1-17 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Hernández-Quevedo, Cristina & Jones, Andrew M. & Rice, Nigel, 2008. "Persistence in health limitations: A European comparative analysis," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(6), pages 1472-1488, December.
    7. David Cantarero & Marta Pascual, 2005. "Socio-Economic Status And Health: Evidence From The Echp," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 9(9), pages 1-17.
    8. Katharina Hauck & Aki Tsuchiya, 2010. "Health mobility: implications for efficiency and equity in priority setting," Monash Econometrics and Business Statistics Working Papers 6/10, Monash University, Department of Econometrics and Business Statistics.
    9. Maite Blázquez Cuesta & Santiago Budría, 2013. "Does income deprivation affect people’s mental well-being?," Banco de Espa�a Working Papers 1312, Banco de Espa�a.

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