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Inequalities in health and health service use: Evidence from the general household survey

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  • Haynes, Robin
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    Abstract

    The General Household Survey data file for 1982 was examined to identify variations in self-reported morbidity and health service use between socio-economic groups and geographical areas in Great Britain. Both acute and chronic morbidity varied with socio-economic status. Morbidity was more strongly related to housing tenure and car availability than to occupational class. A north-west to south-east gradient in sickness was observed, although morbidity was comparatively high in Wales and comparatively low in Scotland, taking mortality differences into account. The highest age-adjusted morbidity ratios were for females in multiple occupancy inner city areas. Service use rates in relation to reported sickness showed little systematic variation. There was an indication that lack of car transport was an inhibiting factor for the sick in rural areas.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Social Science & Medicine.

    Volume (Year): 33 (1991)
    Issue (Month): 4 (January)
    Pages: 361-368

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:33:y:1991:i:4:p:361-368

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    Keywords: morbidity health service use General Household Survey;

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    Cited by:
    1. Adams, Peter & Hurd, Michael D. & McFadden, Daniel & Merrill, Angela & Ribeiro, Tiago, 2003. "Healthy, wealthy, and wise? Tests for direct causal paths between health and socioeconomic status," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 112(1), pages 3-56, January.
    2. Lori J. Curtis & William J. MacMinn, 2008. "Health Care Utilization in Canada: Twenty-five Years of Evidence," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 34(1), pages 65-88, March.
    3. Robin Thompson & Nigel Miller & Sophie Witter, 2003. "Health-seeking behaviour and rural|urban variation in Kazakhstan," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(7), pages 553-564.
    4. Maria Goddard & Peter Smith, 1998. "Equity of access to health care," Working Papers 032cheop, Centre for Health Economics, University of York.
    5. Christian Salas, 2002. "On the empirical association between poor health and low socioeconomic status at old age," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 11(3), pages 207-220.
    6. Kalediene, Ramune & Petrauskiene, Jadvyga, 2004. "Socio-economic transition, inequality, and mortality in Lithuania," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 2(1), pages 87-95, March.

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