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The Impact of SES on Health over the Life-Course

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  • James P. Smith

Abstract

People of lower socio-economic status (SES) have much worse health outcomes (Marmot (1999), Smith (1999)). But why this is so remains under considerable debate ((Adams et al. (2003), Deaton (2003)). A central question is whether these large differences in health by such SES indicators as income or wealth largely reflect causation from SES to health. But even if SES mainly affects health, what dimensions of SES actually matter-financial aspects such as income or wealth or non-financial dimensions like education?

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by RAND Corporation Publications Department in its series Working Papers with number 318.

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Length: 39 pages
Date of creation: Aug 2005
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ran:wpaper:318

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  1. Angus Deaton, 2001. "Health, Inequality, and Economic Development," NBER Working Papers 8318, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. James P. Smith & Duncan Thomas, 2003. "Remembrances of things past: test-retest reliability of retrospective migration histories," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 166(1), pages 23-49.
  3. Crossley, Thomas F. & Kennedy, Steven, 2002. "The reliability of self-assessed health status," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 643-658, July.
  4. Janet Currie & Rosemary Hyson, 1999. "Is the Impact of Health Shocks Cushioned by Socioeconomic Status? The Case of Low Birthweight," NBER Working Papers 6999, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Adams, Peter & Hurd, Michael D. & McFadden, Daniel & Merrill, Angela & Ribeiro, Tiago, 2003. "Healthy, wealthy, and wise? Tests for direct causal paths between health and socioeconomic status," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 112(1), pages 3-56, January.
  6. Bound, John & Brown, Charles & Mathiowetz, Nancy, 2001. "Measurement error in survey data," Handbook of Econometrics, in: J.J. Heckman & E.E. Leamer (ed.), Handbook of Econometrics, edition 1, volume 5, chapter 59, pages 3705-3843 Elsevier.
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Cited by:
  1. David Cutler & Angus Deaton & Adriana Lleras-Muney, 2005. "The Determinants of Mortality," Working Papers 235, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Health and Wellbeing..
  2. Janet Currie & Enrico Moretti, 2007. "Biology as Destiny? Short- and Long-Run Determinants of Intergenerational Transmission of Birth Weight," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 25, pages 231-264.
  3. Hernández-Quevedo, Cristina & Jones, Andrew M. & Rice, Nigel, 2008. "Persistence in health limitations: A European comparative analysis," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(6), pages 1472-1488, December.
  4. Hans van Kippersluis & Owen O'Donnell & Eddy van Doorslaer & Tom Van Ourti, 2009. "Socioeconomic Differences in Health over the Life Cycle in an Egalitarian Country," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 09-006/3, Tinbergen Institute.
  5. Smith, James P., 2009. "Re-Constructing Childhood Health Histories," IZA Discussion Papers 4036, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  6. Coe, Norma B. & Lindeboom, Maarten, 2008. "Does Retirement Kill You? Evidence from Early Retirement Windows," IZA Discussion Papers 3817, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. Jody Schimmel, 2006. "Men With Health Insurance and the Women Who Love Them: the Effect of a Husband's Retirement on His Wife's Health Insurance Coverage," Working Papers wp131, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.

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