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Evidence on the relationship between income and poor health: is the government doing enough?

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  • Michaela Benzeval
  • Jayne Taylor

    (Institute for Fiscal Studies)

  • Ken Judge
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    Abstract

    The government’s report, Opportunity for All: Tackling Poverty and Social Exclusion (Department of Social Security, 1999), identified poor health as one of the major problems associated with low income. However, much of the available evidence on the relationship between income and health is of little help in forming policies to reduce health inequalities, as it has tended to be based on cross-section surveys and is therefore unable to shed much light on causal effects. Here, we make use of two British longitudinal datasets to examine the longer-term influences of income on health within a life-course perspective. We then use the results of our analysis to provide a brief critical assessment of the likely success of the government’s anti-poverty strategy in reducing health inequalities. A more detailed assessment of government policy in this respect can be found in Benzeval et al. (forthcoming).

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Institute for Fiscal Studies in its journal Fiscal Studies.

    Volume (Year): 21 (2000)
    Issue (Month): 3 (September)
    Pages: 375-399

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    Handle: RePEc:ifs:fistud:v:21:y:2000:i:3:p:375-399

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    Cited by:
    1. Costa-Font, Joan & Hernández-Quevedo, Cristina, 2012. "Measuring inequalities in health: What do we know? What do we need to know?," Health Policy, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 106(2), pages 195-206.
    2. Andrew M. Jones & Ángel López, 2003. "Measurement and explanation of socioeconomic inequality in health with longitudinal data," Working Papers, Research Center on Health and Economics, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra 711, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
    3. Amedeo Spadaro & Lucia Mangiavacchi & Ignacio Moral-Arce & Marta Adiego-Estella & Angela Blanco-Moreno, 2013. "Evaluating the redistributive impact of public health expenditure using an insurance value approach," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer, Springer, vol. 14(5), pages 775-787, October.
    4. Hernández-Quevedo, Cristina & Jones, Andrew M. & Rice, Nigel, 2008. "Persistence in health limitations: A European comparative analysis," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 27(6), pages 1472-1488, December.
    5. Ken Judge & Iain Paterson, 2001. "Poverty, Income Inequality and Health," Treasury Working Paper Series 01/29, New Zealand Treasury.
    6. David Cantarero & Marta Pascual, 2005. "Regional Differences In Health In Spain - An Empirical Analysis," ERSA conference papers ersa05p551, European Regional Science Association.
    7. Cristina Hernandez-Quevedo & Andrew M Jones & Nigel Rice, . "Reporting Bias and Heterogeneity in Self-Assessed Health. Evidence from the British Household Panel Survey," Discussion Papers, Department of Economics, University of York 04/18, Department of Economics, University of York.
    8. Teresa Bago d'Uva, 2005. "Latent class models for use of primary care: evidence from a British panel," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(9), pages 873-892.
    9. Paul Contoyannis & Andrew M. Jones & Nigel Rice, 2004. "The dynamics of health in the British Household Panel Survey," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(4), pages 473-503.

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