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The Transition from Good to Poor Health: An Econometric Study of the Older Population

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  • Neil J. Buckley
  • Frank T. Denton
  • A. Leslie Robb
  • Byron G. Spencer

Abstract

This is a study of the influence of socioeconomic factors on the state of health of older Canadians. Three years of panel data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics are used to model the transition probabilities between good and poor health. Care is taken to avoid the problem of endogeneity of income in modelling its effects, and to adjust reported income to free it from its strong association with age at the time of the survey. Of particular note are the significant effects found for income, in spite of universal public health care coverage. Significant effects are found also for age, education, and other variables.

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File URL: http://socserv.mcmaster.ca/qsep/p/qsep381.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by McMaster University in its series Quantitative Studies in Economics and Population Research Reports with number 381.

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Length: 39 pages
Date of creation: Feb 2003
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:mcm:qseprr:381

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Keywords: Socioeconomic factors and health; older population; panel data;

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References

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  1. Angus Deaton, 2003. "Health, Inequality, and Economic Development," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 41(1), pages 113-158, March.
  2. Dana P. Goldman & James P. Smith, 2004. "Can Patient Self-Management Help Explain the SES Health Gradient?," HEW 0403004, EconWPA.
  3. Deanna L. Williamson & Janet E. Fast, 1998. "Poverty Status, Health Behaviours, and Health: Implications for Social Assistance and Health Care Policy," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 24(1), pages 1-25, March.
  4. Parminder Raina & Vicki Torrance-Rynard & Micheline Wong & Christel Woodward, 2002. "Agreement between Self-Reported and Routinely Collected Health Care Utilisation Data among Seniors," Social and Economic Dimensions of an Aging Population Research Papers 81, McMaster University.
  5. John Bound, 1991. "Self-Reported Versus Objective Measures of Health in Retirement Models," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 26(1), pages 106-138.
  6. Benzeval, Michaela & Judge, Ken, 2001. "Income and health: the time dimension," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 52(9), pages 1371-1390, May.
  7. James P. Smith, 1999. "Healthy Bodies and Thick Wallets: The Dual Relation between Health and Economic Status," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 13(2), pages 145-166, Spring.
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