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How should economics curricula be evaluated?

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  • Andrew Mearman

    ()
    (University of the West of England, Bristol)

Abstract

This paper explores the evaluation of economics curricula. It argues that the dominant approach in economics education, experimentalism, has serious limitations which render it an unsuitable evaluation method in some cases. The arguments against experimentalism are practical, ethical and also rest on a view of the world as a complex, open system in which contexts are unique and generalised regularities are unlikely. In such an environment, as often found in educational contexts, alternative methods are advisable, at least as part of a suite of approaches in a realistic, case-based, mixed-methods approach to evaluation. Thus, economics curricula should be evaluated using a method or set of methods most appropriate to the particular object case. As such, there is no single answer to the question posed.

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File URL: http://www2.uwe.ac.uk/faculties/BBS/BUS/Research/Economics13/1306.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol in its series Working Papers with number 20131306.

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Date of creation: 06 Jan 2013
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Handle: RePEc:uwe:wpaper:20131306

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Postal: Frenchay Campus, Coldharbour Lane, Bristol BS16 1QY
Phone: 0117 328 3610
Web page: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/bl/research/bristoleconomics.aspx
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  1. June Lapidus, 2011. "But which theory is right? Economic pluralism, developmental epistemology and uncertainty," International Journal of Pluralism and Economics Education, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 2(1), pages 82-95.
  2. Cher Ping Lim, 1998. "The Effect of a Computer-Based Learning (CBL) Support Package on the Learning Outcome of Low-Performance Economics Students," Computers in Higher Education Economics Review, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 12(1), pages 19-26.
  3. Paul Downward & Andrew Mearman, 2007. "Retroduction as mixed-methods triangulation in economic research: reorienting economics into social science," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 31(1), pages 77-99, January.
  4. Stephen Resnick & Richard D. Wolff, 2011. "Teaching economics differently by comparing contesting theories," International Journal of Pluralism and Economics Education, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 2(1), pages 57-68.
  5. Siakantaris, Nikos, 2000. "Experimental Economics under the Microscope," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 24(3), pages 267-81, May.
  6. Salvador Contreras & Frank Badua & Mitchell Adrian, 2012. "Peer Effects on Undergraduate Business Student Performance," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 11(1), pages 57-66.
  7. Iwan Barankay & Magnus Johannesson & John List & Richard Friberg & Matti Liski & Kjetil Storesletten, 2013. "Guest Editors’ Preface to the Special Symposium on Field Experiments," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 115(1), pages 1-2, 01.
  8. Richard McIntyre & Robert Van Horn, 2011. "Contending perspectives in one department," International Journal of Pluralism and Economics Education, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 2(1), pages 69-81.
  9. Charles Barone, 2011. "Contending economic perspectives at a liberal arts college: a 25-year retrospective," International Journal of Pluralism and Economics Education, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 2(1), pages 19-38.
  10. Peter Davies & Ross Guest, 2010. "What effect do we really have on students' understanding and attitudes? How do we know?," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 9(1), pages 6-9.
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