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Contending Perspectives, Twenty Years On: What Have Our Students Learned?

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Author Info

  • Robert Garnett

    ()
    (Department of Economics, Texas Christian University)

  • Andrew Mearman

    ()
    (Department of Economics, University of the West of England)

Abstract

The authors examine the pluralism of Barone (1991) through the lens of subsequent developments in the pluralist economics literature, particularly the shift from teacher-centred to student-centred conceptions of education and the growing demands for evidence to demonstrate student achievement of stated learning goals. This contextual frame opens the door to a fresh appraisal of Barone’s ‘contending perspectives’ model, both as a landmark contribution to pluralist education and as a touchstone for future efforts to reach beyond conventional heterodox/mainstream boundaries in order to expand the liberal education mission of undergraduate economics.

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File URL: http://www.econ.tcu.edu/RePEc/tcu/wpaper/wp11-04.pdf
File Function: First version, 2011
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Texas Christian University, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 201104.

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Length: 32 pages
Date of creation: Jan 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:tcu:wpaper:201104

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Web page: http://www.econ.tcu.edu/
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Related research

Keywords: Barone; contending perspectives; heterodox; liberal education; pluralism; evidence; student-centred learning;

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References

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  1. Dow, Sheila C, 1990. "Beyond Dualism," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 14(2), pages 143-57, June.
  2. Freeman, Alan, 2007. "Catechism versus pluralism: the heterodox response to the national undergraduate curriculum proposed by the UK Quality Assurance Authority," MPRA Paper 6832, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Alan Freeman, 2009. "The Economists of Tomorrow: the Case for a Pluralist Subject Benchmark Statement for Economics," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 8(2), pages 23-40.
  4. Tonia Warnecke, 2009. "Teaching globalisation from a feminist pluralist perspective," International Journal of Pluralism and Economics Education, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 1(1/2), pages 93-107.
  5. Victoria Chick & Sheila Dow, 2005. "The meaning of open systems," Journal of Economic Methodology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(3), pages 363-381.
  6. Bartlett, Robin L & Feiner, Susan F, 1992. "Balancing the Economics Curriculum: Content, Method, and Pedagogy," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(2), pages 559-64, May.
  7. Peter Davies & Ross Guest, 2010. "What effect do we really have on students' understanding and attitudes? How do we know?," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 9(1), pages 6-9.
  8. Paul Downward & Andrew Mearman, 2007. "Retroduction as mixed-methods triangulation in economic research: reorienting economics into social science," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 31(1), pages 77-99, January.
  9. Andy Denis, 2009. "Pluralism in Economics Education," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 8(2), pages 6-22.
  10. Shackelford, Jean, 1992. "Feminist Pedagogy: A Means for Bringing Critical Thinking and Creativity to the Economics Classroom," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(2), pages 570-76, May.
  11. Siegfried, John J & Meszaros, Bonnie T, 1997. "National Voluntary Content Standards for Pre-College Economics Education," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(2), pages 247-53, May.
  12. McCloskey, Donald N, 1983. "The Rhetoric of Economics," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 21(2), pages 481-517, June.
  13. Becker, William E., 2007. "Quit lying and address the controversies: there are no dogmata, laws, rules or standards in the science of economics," MPRA Paper 39958, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  14. Marianne Ferber, 1999. "Guidelines For Pre-College Economics Education: A Critique," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(3), pages 135-142.
  15. Feiner, Susan & Roberts, Bruce, 1995. "Using Alternative Paradigms to Teach about Race and Gender: A Critical Thinking Approach to Introductory Economics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(2), pages 367-71, May.
  16. Fels, Rendigs, 1974. "Developing Independent Problem-Solving Ability in Elementary Economics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 64(2), pages 403-07, May.
  17. Andrew Mearman, 2011. "Pluralism, Heterodoxy, and the Rhetoric of Distinction," Review of Radical Political Economics, Union for Radical Political Economics, vol. 43(4), pages 552-561, December.
  18. Stephen Kinsella, 2010. "Pedagogical approaches to theories of endogenous versus exogenous money," International Journal of Pluralism and Economics Education, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 1(3), pages 276-282.
  19. Janice Peterson & KimMarie McGoldrick, 2009. "Pluralism and Economic Education: a Learning Theory Approach," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 8(2), pages 72-90.
  20. Sheila Dow, 2009. "History of Thought and Methodology in Pluralist Economics Education," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 8(2), pages 41-57.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Andrew Mearman & Aspasia Papa & Don Webber, 2014. "Why do Students Study Economics?," Economic Issues Journal Articles, Economic Issues, vol. 19(1), pages 119-147, March.
    • Andrew Mearman & Aspasia Papa & Don J. Webber, 2013. "Why do students study economics?," Working Papers 20131303, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
  2. Andrew Mearman & Tim Wakeley & Gamila Shoib & Don J. Webber, 2009. "Does pluralism in economics education make better educated, happier students? A qualitative analysis," Working Papers 0916, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
  3. Andrew Mearman, 2012. "Pluralist economics curricula: do they work; and how would we know?," Working Papers 20121203, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.

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