Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

The Efficiency of a Group-Specific Mandated Benefit Revisited: The Effect of Infertility Mandates

Contents:

Author Info

  • Joanna N. Lahey

    (Texas A & M University)

Abstract

This paper examines the labor market effects of state health insurance mandates that increase the cost of employing a demographically identifiable group. State mandates requiring that health insurance plans cover infertility treatment raise the relative cost of insuring older women of child-bearing age. Empirically, wages in this group are unaffected, but their total labor input decreases. Workers do not value infertility mandates at cost, and so will not take wage cuts in exchange, leading employers to decrease their demand for this affected and identifiable group. Differences in the empirical effects of mandates found in the literature are explained by a model including variations in the elasticity of demand, moral hazard, ability to identify a group, and adverse selection.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://research.upjohn.org/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1192&context=up_workingpapers
Download Restriction: This material is copyrighted. Permission is required to reproduce any or all parts.

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research in its series Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles with number 11-175.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: May 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:upj:weupjo:11-175

Contact details of provider:
Postal: 300 S. Westnedge Ave. Kalamazoo, MI 49007 USA
Phone: 1-269-343-5541
Fax: 1-269-343-7310
Email:
Web page: http://www.upjohn.org
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: labor supply; infertility; health insurance; health insurance mandates;

Other versions of this item:

Find related papers by JEL classification:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Briggs Depew & James Bailey, . "Did the Affordable Care Act's Dependent Coverage Mandate Increase Premiums?," Departmental Working Papers 2014-07, Department of Economics, Louisiana State University.
  2. Joelle Abramowitz, 2014. "Turning back the ticking clock: the effect of increased affordability of assisted reproductive technology on women’s marriage timing," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 27(2), pages 603-633, April.
  3. Bailey, James, 2013. "Who pays for obesity? Evidence from health insurance benefit mandates," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 121(2), pages 287-289.
  4. Yaa Akosa Antwi & Asako S. Moriya & Kosali Simon, 2012. "Effects of Federal Policy to Insure Young Adults: Evidence from the 2010 Affordable Care Act Dependent Coverage Mandate," NBER Working Papers 18200, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:upj:weupjo:11-175. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: ().

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.