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Baby Busts and Baby Booms: The Fertility Response to Shocks in Dynastic Models

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  • Alice Schoonbroodt

    (University of Southampton)

  • Larry E. Jones

    (University of Minnesota)

Abstract

captures between 48 and 93 percent of the post-WWII baby boom.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Society for Economic Dynamics in its series 2010 Meeting Papers with number 144.

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Date of creation: 2010
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Handle: RePEc:red:sed010:144

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Postal: Society for Economic Dynamics Christian Zimmermann Economic Research Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis PO Box 442 St. Louis MO 63166-0442 USA
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Web page: http://www.EconomicDynamics.org/society.htm
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References

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  1. Cette, G. & Kocoglu, Y. & Mairesse, J., 2010. "Productivity Growth and Levels in France, Japan, the United Kingdom and the United States in the Twentieth Century," Working papers, Banque de France 271, Banque de France.
  2. Mateos-Planas, Xavier, 2000. "The European demographic transition," Discussion Paper Series In Economics And Econometrics 0031, Economics Division, School of Social Sciences, University of Southampton.
  3. Diane J. Macunovich, 1998. "Fertility and the Easterlin hypothesis: An assessment of the literature," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, Springer, vol. 11(1), pages 53-111.
  4. Rodolfo E. Manuelli & Ananth Seshadri, 2009. "Explaining International Fertility Differences," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, MIT Press, vol. 124(2), pages 771-807, May.
  5. Jeremy Greenwood & Ananth Seshadri & Guillaume Vandenbroucke, 2005. "The Baby Boom and Baby Bust," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(1), pages 183-207, March.
  6. Schoonbroodt, Alice & Tertilt, Michele, 2010. "Property rights and efficiency in OLG models with endogenous fertility," Discussion Paper Series In Economics And Econometrics 1020, Economics Division, School of Social Sciences, University of Southampton.
  7. Matthias Doepke & Moshe Hazan & Yishay Maoz, 2007. "The Baby Boom and World War II: A Macroeconomic Analysis," NBER Working Papers 13707, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Larry E. Jones & Alice Schoonbroodt, 2010. "Complements Versus Substitutes And Trends In Fertility Choice In Dynastic Models," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 51(3), pages 671-699, 08.
  9. Andolfatto, David & Gervais, Martin, 2008. "Endogenous debt constraints in a life-cycle model with an application to social security," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 32(12), pages 3745-3759, December.
  10. Claudia Olivetti & Stefania Albanesi, 2010. "Maternal Health and the Baby Boom," 2010 Meeting Papers, Society for Economic Dynamics 85, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  11. Huggett, Mark, 1996. "Wealth distribution in life-cycle economies," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 38(3), pages 469-494, December.
  12. Michael R. Haines, 1994. "The Population of the United States, 1790-1920," NBER Historical Working Papers, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc 0056, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. JohnKarl Scholz & Ananth Seshadri, 2007. "Children and Household Wealth," Working Papers, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center wp158, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
  14. Elizabeth M. Caucutt & Nezih Guner & John Knowles, 2002. "Why Do Women Wait? Matching, Wage Inequality, and the Incentives for Fertility Delay," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 5(4), pages 815-855, October.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Nico Voigtländer & Joachim Voth, 2008. "How the West "invented" fertility restriction," Economics Working Papers 1264, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Dec 2012.
  2. Jeremy Greenwood & Ananth Seshadri & Guillaume Vandenbroucke, 2011. "Measurement Without Theory: A Response to Bailey and Collins," RCER Working Papers 561, University of Rochester - Center for Economic Research (RCER).
  3. Masako Kimura & Daishin Yasui, 2010. "The Galor–Weil gender-gap model revisited: from home to market," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, Springer, vol. 15(4), pages 323-351, December.
  4. Matthias Doepke & Moshe Hazan & Yishay Maoz, 2007. "The Baby Boom and World War II: A Macroeconomic Analysis," NBER Working Papers 13707, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Tamura, Robert & Simon, Curtis & Murphy, Kevin M., 2012. "Black and White Fertility, Differential Baby Booms: The Value of Civil Rights," MPRA Paper 40921, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  6. Vandenbroucke, Guillaume, 2011. "Optimal fertility during World War I," MPRA Paper 35709, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  7. Larry E. Jones & Alice Schoonbroodt, 2010. "Complements Versus Substitutes And Trends In Fertility Choice In Dynastic Models," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 51(3), pages 671-699, 08.
  8. Larry E. Jones & Alice Schoonbroodt & Michèle Tertilt, 2010. "Fertility Theories: Can They Explain the Negative Fertility-Income Relationship?," NBER Chapters, in: Demography and the Economy, pages 43-100 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Daishin Yasui, 2014. "A Theory of the Cross-Sectional Fertility Differential: Jobsf Heterogeneity Approach," Discussion Papers 1409, Graduate School of Economics, Kobe University.
  10. Kai Zhao, 2013. "War Finance and the Baby Boom," Working papers, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics 2013-25, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
  11. Orman, Cuneyt & Goksel, Turkmen & Gurdal, Mehmet Y, 2011. "The Baby Boom, Baby Busts, and Grandmothers," MPRA Paper 28782, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  12. Nick Parr, 2011. "The contribution of increases in family benefits to Australia’s early 21st-century fertility increase: An empirical analysis," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 25(6), pages 215-244, July.

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