Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Fertility and the Easterlin hypothesis: An assessment of the literature

Contents:

Author Info

  • Diane J. Macunovich

    ()
    (Maxwell Center for Policy Research, 426 Eggers Hall, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY 13244-1020, USA)

Abstract

Focusing just on the fertility aspects of the Easterlin hypothesis, this paper offers a critical assessment - rather than just a selective citation - of the extensive fertility literature generated by Easterlin, and a complete inventory of data and methodologies in seventy-six published analyses. With an equal number of micro- and macro-level analyses using North American data (twenty-two), the "track record" of the hypothesis is the same in both venues, with fifteen providing significant support in each case. The literature suggests unequivocal support for the relativity of the income concept in fertility, but is less clear regarding the source(s) of differences in material aspirations, and suggests that the observed relationship between fertility and cohort size has varied across countries and time periods due to the effects of additional factors not included in most models.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00148/papers/8011001/80110053.pdf
Download Restriction: Access to the full text of the articles in this series is restricted

File URL: http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00148/papers/8011001/80110053.ps.gz
Download Restriction: Access to the full text of the articles in this series is restricted

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal Journal of Population Economics.

Volume (Year): 11 (1998)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 53-111

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:11:y:1998:i:1:p:53-111

Note: Received: 16 July 1996 / Accepted: 26 September 1997
Contact details of provider:
Phone: +43-70-2468-8236
Fax: +43-70-2468-8238
Email:
Web page: http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00148/index.htm
More information through EDIRC

Order Information:
Web: http://link.springer.de/orders.htm

Related research

Keywords: Easterlin · relative income · fertility;

Find related papers by JEL classification:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Zamac, Jovan & Hallberg, Daniel & Lindh, Thomas, 2008. "Low fertility and long run growth in an economy with a large public sector," Arbetsrapport 2008:11, Institute for Futures Studies.
  2. Aoki, Reiko, 2008. "On the Persistence of Low Birthrate in Japan," PIE/CIS Discussion Paper 347, Center for Intergenerational Studies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
  3. Yongil Jeon & Sang-Young Rhyu & Michael P. Shields, 2007. "Asian Demographic Transition: An Instrumental-Variables Panel Approach," Development Research Unit Working Paper Series 28-07, Monash University, Department of Economics.
  4. Kosei Fukuda, 2008. "Age–Period–Cohort Decomposition of U.S. and Japanese Birth Rates," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer, vol. 27(4), pages 385-402, August.
  5. Aoki, Reiko & Konishi, Yoko, 2009. "The Relationship between Consumption, Labor Supply and Fertility: Theory and Evidence from Japan," PIE/CIS Discussion Paper 420, Center for Intergenerational Studies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
  6. Larry E. Jones & Michele Tertilt, 2006. "An Economic History of Fertility in the U.S.: 1826-1960," NBER Working Papers 12796, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Laurie Derose & Øystein Kravdal, 2007. "Educational reversals and first-birth timing in sub-saharan africa: A dynamic multilevel approach," Demography, Springer, vol. 44(1), pages 59-77, February.
  8. Diane Macunovich, 1999. "The Role of Relative Cohort Size and Relative Income in the Demographic Transition," Center for Policy Research Working Papers 9, Center for Policy Research, Maxwell School, Syracuse University.
  9. Diane J. Macunovich, 2000. "Relative Cohort Size: Source of a Unifying Theory of Global Fertility Transition?," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 26(2), pages 235-261.
  10. Martha J. Bailey & William J. Collins, 2011. "Did Improvements in Household Technology Cause the Baby Boom? Evidence from Electrification, Appliance Diffusion, and the Amish," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 3(2), pages 189-217, April.
  11. Larry E. Jones & Alice Schoonbroodt, 2010. "Baby Busts and Baby Booms: The Fertility Response to Shocks in Dynastic Models," NBER Working Papers 16596, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Diego Montano, 2011. "Asymptotic Income Distribution in the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP): Income Inequality and Darwinian Fitness," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 427, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  13. Macunovich, Diane J., 1998. "Race and relative income/price of time effects on U.S. fertility," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 365-400.
  14. Martin Dribe & Maria Stanfors, 2009. "Education, Work and Parenthood: Comparing the Experience of Young Men and Women in Sweden," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 30(1), pages 32-42, March.
  15. Paraskevi Salamaliki & Ioannis Venetis & Nicholas Giannakopoulos, 2013. "The causal relationship between female labor supply and fertility in the USA: updated evidence via a time series multi-horizon approach," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 26(1), pages 109-145, January.
  16. Macunovich, Diane J., 2011. "Re-Visiting the Easterlin Hypothesis: U.S. Fertility 1968-2010," IZA Discussion Papers 5885, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:11:y:1998:i:1:p:53-111. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Guenther Eichhorn) or (Christopher F Baum).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.