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Working Hour Arrangements and Working Hours A Microeconometric Analysis Based on German Time Diary Data

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  • Merz, Joachim
  • Burgert, Derik

Abstract

The labour market providing individual resources and economic well-being is still a topic in the economic and social policy discussion. In the course of time the traditional full-time work is diminishing, new labour arrangements are discussed (keyword: flexible labour markets). This study will contribute to the discussion of working hour arrangements by quantifying patterns of explanation of ‘who is working when within a workday’. In particular we want to disentangle certain working hour patterns and the final hours of work according to those different patterns allowing for market and non-market influences.The daily working hour patterns are analysed by two dimensions: the fragmentation of a working day (by the number of working episodes) and the timing of work time by location of those episodes within the day’s period. Deducting such patterns allows not only to describe possible workday interruptions and workday behaviour in general,but to give hints for which groups of the society non-traditional working time is important. Once quantified, labour market policy has a sound base for a targeted policy. Our model is based on a microeconomic labour supply approach, however extended by two dimensions: first,by daily working time arrangements with focus on core and non core working time crossed by number of episodes and, second, by labour supply factors in a market and non market context. Our microeconometric estimates use a multinomial logit (MNL) model to explain the working hour arrangement probability and a MNL selectivity bias corrected hours estimation for arrangement specific working hours with correct asymptotic covariances. Our study is the first German study of this kind which could analyse the actual available German Time Use Survey 1991/92 from the Federal Statistical Office with ca.32.000 time diaries.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 5979.

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Date of creation: Jun 2003
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:5979

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Related research

Keywords: Working hour arrangements; timing of work time; working hours; German time budget stud; time use diary data; dicrete/continous extended labour supply modelling and MNL/COLS-estimation;

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References

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  1. Burkhauser, Richard V. & Smeeding, Timothy M. & Merz, Joachim, 1994. "Relative Inequality and Poverty in Germany and the United States Using Alternative Equivalence Scales," MPRA Paper 7229, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. C. A. de Kam & J. de Haan & C. Giles & A. Manresa & E. Berenguer & J. Merz & K. Venkatarama, 1996. "The distribution of effective tax burdens in four EU countries," FFB-Discussionpaper 21, Research Institute on Professions (Forschungsinstitut Freie Berufe (FFB)), LEUPHANA University Lüneburg.
  3. Harvey, Andrew & Fisher, Kimberly & Gershuny, Jonathan & Akbari, Ather, 2000. "Examining working time arrangements using time use survey data," ISER Working Paper Series 2000-22, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  4. Joachim Merz, 1995. "MICSIM - Concept, Developments and Applications of a PC-Microsimulation Model for Research and Teaching," FFB-Discussionpaper 14, Research Institute on Professions (Forschungsinstitut Freie Berufe (FFB)), LEUPHANA University Lüneburg.
  5. Pencavel, John, 1987. "Labor supply of men: A survey," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & R. Layard (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 1, pages 3-102 Elsevier.
  6. Soest, A.H.O. van & Woittiez, I.B. & Kapteyn, A.J., 1990. "Labor supply, income taxes and hours restrictions in the Netherlands," Open Access publications from Tilburg University urn:nbn:nl:ui:12-364378, Tilburg University.
  7. Hamermesh, Daniel S, 1998. "When We Work," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(2), pages 321-25, May.
  8. Ham, John C, 1982. "Estimation of a Labour Supply Model with Censoring Due to Unemployment and Underemployment," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(3), pages 335-54, July.
  9. C. A. de Kam & J. de Haan & C. Giles & A. Manresa & E. Berenguer & S. Calonge & J. Merz, 1996. "Who pays the taxes?," FFB-Discussionpaper 18, Research Institute on Professions (Forschungsinstitut Freie Berufe (FFB)), LEUPHANA University Lüneburg.
    • de Kam, C. A. & de Haan, J. & Giles, C. & Manresa, A. & Berenguer, E. & Calonge, S., 1996. "Who pays the taxes?," MPRA Paper 7146, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  10. Hamermesh, Daniel S, 1999. "The Timing of Work over Time," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 109(452), pages 37-66, January.
  11. Joachim, Merz, 2002. "Time Use Research and Time Use Data Actual Topics and New Frontiers," MPRA Paper 6347, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  12. Killingsworth, Mark R. & Heckman, James J., 1987. "Female labor supply: A survey," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & R. Layard (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 2, pages 103-204 Elsevier.
  13. Hamermesh, Daniel S., 2000. "Timing, Togetherness and Time Windfalls," IZA Discussion Papers 173, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  14. Lee, Lung-Fei, 1983. "Generalized Econometric Models with Selectivity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 51(2), pages 507-12, March.
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Cited by:
  1. Joachim Merz & Derik Burgert, 2005. "Arbeitszeitarrangements - Neue Ergebnisse aus der nationalen Zeitbudgeterhebung 2001/02 im Zeitvergleich zu 1991/92," FFB-Discussionpaper 47, Research Institute on Professions (Forschungsinstitut Freie Berufe (FFB)), LEUPHANA University Lüneburg.
  2. Pfeifer, Christian, 2005. "Betriebliche Determinanten von Teilzeitarbeit, Mini- und Midi-Jobs; Eine theoretische und empirische Analyse mit niedersächsischen Betriebsdaten," Hannover Economic Papers (HEP) dp-324, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät.
  3. Joachim Merz & Derik Burgert, 2004. "Wer arbeitet wann? Arbeitszeitarrangements von Selbständigen und abhängig Beschäftigten: Eine mikroökonometrische Analyse deutscher Zeitbudgetdaten," FFB-Discussionpaper 45, Research Institute on Professions (Forschungsinstitut Freie Berufe (FFB)), LEUPHANA University Lüneburg, revised Jul 2004.
  4. Dominik Hanglberger, 2011. "Arbeitszufriedenheit im internationalen Vergleich," FFB-Discussionpaper 86, Research Institute on Professions (Forschungsinstitut Freie Berufe (FFB)), LEUPHANA University Lüneburg.

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