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Can Private School Growth Foster Universal Literacy? Panel Evidence from Indian Districts

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  • Pal, Sarmistha

    ()
    (University of Surrey)

  • Kingdon, Geeta

    ()
    (Institute of Education, University of London)

Abstract

Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) set the agenda for the attainment of universal literacy by 2015 primarily to be delivered by the state sector. This agenda tends to ignore the significant private school growth around the world since early 1990s, thus initiating the policy debate as to whether private school growth may foster 'education for all'. Despite growing literature on the difficulties of attaining MDGs, there is hardly any attempt to assess the role of private sector in this respect. Using India as an important case in point, we intend to bridge this gap of the literature. Results using a unique district-level panel data-set from 17 major states of India for the period 1992-2002 that we compile highlight a significant positive impact of private school growth on literacy while its effect on gender gap in literacy remains rather limited in our sample. Compared to 15-19 year olds, private school effect of literacy is stronger among 10-14 year old children. Interesting variations across the regions and also among the marginalised ethnic groups are noted. The paper offers explanations for the findings.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 5274.

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Length: 38 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp5274

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Related research

Keywords: private school growth; universal literacy; gender gap; Millennium Development Goals; India; Asia;

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  1. Geeta Kingdon & Francis Teal, 2008. "Teacher Unions, Teacher Pay and Student Performance in India: A Pupil Fixed Effects Approach," CESifo Working Paper Series 2428, CESifo Group Munich.
  2. Esther Duflo & Rema Hanna, 2005. "Monitoring Works: Getting Teachers to Come to School," Working Papers id:301, eSocialSciences.
  3. Rob French & Geeta Kingdon, 2010. "The relative effectiveness of private and government schools in Rural India: Evidence from ASER data," DoQSS Working Papers 10-03, Department of Quantitative Social Science - Institute of Education, University of London.
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Cited by:
  1. Monojit Chatterji & Sushil Mohan & Sayantan Ghosh Dastidar, 2014. "Determinants of public education expenditure: Evidence from Indian states," Dundee Discussion Papers in Economics 279, Economic Studies, University of Dundee.

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