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Monitoring Works: Getting Teachers to Come to School

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  • Esther Duflo

    ()

  • Rema Hanna

    ()

Abstract

In the rural areas of developing countries, teacher absence is a widespread problem. This paper tests whether a simple incentive programme based on teacher presence can reduce teacher absence, and whether it has the potential to lead to more teaching activities and better learning. In 60 informal one-teacher schools in rural India, randomly chosen out of 120 (the treatment schools), a financial incentive programme was initiated to reduce absenteeism. The remaining 60 schools served as comparison schools. The introduction of the program resulted in an immediate decline in teacher absence.The programme positively affected child achievement levels: a year after the start of the programme, test scores in program schools were 0.17 standard deviations higher than in the comparison schools and children were 40 percent more likely to be admitted into regular schools.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by eSocialSciences in its series Working Papers with number id:301.

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Date of creation: Dec 2005
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Handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:301

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Related research

Keywords: teacher; school; teacher absenteeism; one-teacher schools; Education; Sociology;

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  1. Fehr, Ernst & Schmidt, Klaus M., 2004. "Fairness and Incentives in a Multi-Task Principle-Agent Model," CEPR Discussion Papers, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers 4464, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. P. Duraisamy, 2000. "Changes in Returns to Education in India, 1983-94: By Gender, Age-Cohort and Location," Working Papers, Economic Growth Center, Yale University 815, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
  3. Duraisamy, P., 2000. "Changes in Returns to Education in India, 1983-94: By Gender, Age-Cohort and Location," Papers, Yale - Economic Growth Center 815, Yale - Economic Growth Center.
  4. David Card & Dean R. Hyslop, 2004. "Estimating the Effects of a Time Limited Earnings Subsidy for Welfare Leavers," NBER Working Papers 10647, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. John Bound & Todd Stinebrickner & Timothy Waidman, 2004. "Using a Structural Retirement Model to Simulate the Effect of Changes to the OASDI and Medicare Programs," Working Papers, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center wp091, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
  6. Abhijit V. Banerjee & Shawn Cole & Esther Duflo & Leigh Linden, 2007. "Remedying Education: Evidence from Two Randomized Experiments in India," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, MIT Press, vol. 122(3), pages 1235-1264, 08.
  7. Esther Duflo & Pascaline Dupas & Michael Kremer, 2011. "Peer Effects, Teacher Incentives, and the Impact of Tracking: Evidence from a Randomized Evaluation in Kenya," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 101(5), pages 1739-74, August.
  8. Abhijit Banerjee & Esther Duflo, 2006. "Addressing Absence," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 20(1), pages 117-132, Winter.
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