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Job Satisfaction within the Scottish Academic Profession

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Author Info

  • Ward-Warmedinger, Melanie E.

    ()
    (European Central Bank)

  • Sloane, Peter J.

    ()
    (Swansea University)

Abstract

This paper considers job satisfaction in the academic labour market drawing upon a particularly detailed data set of 900 academics from five traditional Scottish Universities. Recent studies have revealed that in the labour force as a whole women generally express themselves as more satisfied with their jobs than men. Our results show that reports of overall job satisfaction do not vary widely by gender. This result is explained through the nature of our dataset, limited as it is to a highly educated workforce, in which female workers are likely to have job expectations comparable to their male counterparts. Ordered probit analysis is used to analyze the determinants of an academics overall satisfaction at work as well as satisfaction with promotion prospects, job security and salary. Comparison salary is found to be an important influence on academics’ overall job satisfaction although evidence suggests that academics place a lower emphasis on pecuniary relative to non pecuniary aspects of work than other sectors of the workforce.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 38.

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Length: 38 pages
Date of creation: Apr 1999
Date of revision:
Publication status: published in: Scottish Journal of Political Economy, 2000, 47 (3), 273-303
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp38

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Related research

Keywords: gender differences; academic labour market; Job satisfaction;

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References

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  1. Clark, Andrew E. & Oswald, Andrew J., 1996. "Satisfaction and comparison income," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(3), pages 359-381, September.
  2. Richard B. Freeman, 1977. "Job Satisfaction as an Economic Variable," NBER Working Papers 0225, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Lazear, Edward P & Rosen, Sherwin, 1990. "Male-Female Wage Differentials in Job Ladders," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 8(1), pages S106-23, January.
  4. Dolton, Peter J & Makepeace, Gerald H, 1987. "Marital Status, Child Rearing and Earnings Differentials in the Graduate Labour Market," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 97(388), pages 897-922, December.
  5. P. J. Sloane & H. Williams, 2000. "Job Satisfaction, Comparison Earnings, and Gender," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 14(3), pages 473-502, 09.
  6. Ermisch, John F & Wright, Robert E, 1988. "Gender Discrimination in the British Labour Market: A Reassessment," CEPR Discussion Papers 278, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  7. George A. Akerlof & Andrew K. Rose & Janet L. Yellen, 1988. "Job Switching and Job Satisfaction in the U.S. Labor Market," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 19(2), pages 495-594.
  8. Greenhalgh, Christine A, 1980. "Male-Female Wage Differentials in Great Britain: Is Marriage an Equal Opportunity?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 90(363), pages 751-75, December.
  9. Miller, Paul W, 1990. "Trade Unions and Job Satisfaction," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 29(55), pages 226-48, December.
  10. Riach, Peter A & Rich, Judith, 1987. "Testing for Sexual Discrimination in the Labour Market," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 26(49), pages 165-78, December.
  11. Clark, A.E., 1995. "Job Satisfaction and Gender: Why Are Women so Happy at Work?," DELTA Working Papers 95-10, DELTA (Ecole normale supérieure).
  12. George J. Borjas, 1979. "Job Satisfaction, Wages, and Unions," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 14(1), pages 21-40.
  13. Miller, Paul W, 1987. "The Wage Effect of the Occupational Segregation of Women in Britain," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 97(388), pages 885-96, December.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Shun-Hsing Chen, 2011. "A performance matrix for strategies to improve satisfaction among faculty members in higher education," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 45(1), pages 75-89, January.
  2. Sinem Aydogdu & Baris Asikgil, 2011. "An Empirical Study of the Relationship Among Job Satisfaction, Organizational Commitment and Turnover Intention," International Review of Management and Marketing, Econjournals, vol. 1(3), pages 43-53, September.
  3. Shields, Michael A. & Wheatley Price, Stephen, 2000. "Racial Harassment, Job Satisfaction and Intentions to Quit: Evidence from the British Nursing Profession," IZA Discussion Papers 164, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Ward-Warmedinger, Melanie E., 1999. "Salary and the Gender Salary Gap in the Academic Profession," IZA Discussion Papers 64, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. J Taylor & S Bradley & A N Nguyen, 2003. "Job autonomy and job satisfaction: new evidence," Working Papers 541528, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
  6. J Taylor & S Bradley & A N Nguyen, 2003. "Relative pay and job satisfaction: some new evidence," Working Papers 541451, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
  7. Butt, Babar Zaheer & Rehman, Kashif Ur & Safwan, Nadeem, 2007. "A study measuring the effect of pay, promotion and training on job satisfaction in pakistani service industry," MPRA Paper 54431, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  8. Ward-Warmedinger, Melanie E., 1999. "Your Everyday, Average Academic," IZA Discussion Papers 63, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  9. Theodossiou, I. & Vasileiou, E., 2007. "Making the risk of job loss a way of life: Does it affect job satisfaction?," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(2), pages 71-83, June.
  10. Ahmed Imran, Hunjra & Muhammad Irfan, Chani & Sher, Aslam & Muhammad, Azam & Kashif-Ur, Rehman, 2010. "Factors Affecting job satisfaction of employees in Pakistani banking sector," MPRA Paper 32130, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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