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Happily Ever After? A Study of Job Satisfaction in Australia

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  • ANTHEA LONG
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    Abstract

    The present paper investigates issues of job satisfaction and gender. In particular, the finding that women are significantly happier in work than their male counterparts is examined. To shed light on this issue, smaller subgroups of the total sample are analysed and more subjective variables (in addition to more traditional objective variables) are incorporated. It is found that differences in reported job satisfaction are more pronounced when looking at individuals with lower levels of education in lower skilled jobs. The determinants of job satisfaction for men and women in this group are significantly different; this was not found to be the case when looking at higher skilled, higher educated individuals. Women in this latter group exhibit similar (i.e. lower) levels of satisfaction to their male counterparts. It is conjectured that this result is due to differences in expectations of work among men and women and also among women themselves. Copyright 2005 The Economic Society Of Australia.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by The Economic Society of Australia in its journal The Economic Record.

    Volume (Year): 81 (2005)
    Issue (Month): 255 (December)
    Pages: 303-321

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    Handle: RePEc:bla:ecorec:v:81:y:2005:i:255:p:303-321

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    Cited by:
    1. Joanna Abhayaratna & Les Andrews & Hudan Nuch & Troy Podbury, 2008. "Part Time Employment: the Australian Experience," Staff Working Papers 0805, Productivity Commission, Government of Australia.
    2. Temesgen Kifle & Isaac H. Desta, 2012. "Gender Differences in Domains of Job Satisfaction: Evidence from Doctoral Graduates from Australian Universities," Economic Analysis and Policy (EAP), Queensland University of Technology (QUT), School of Economics and Finance, vol. 42(3), pages 319-338, December.
    3. Benno Torgler, 2011. "Work Values in Western and Eastern Europe," CREMA Working Paper Series 2011-22, Center for Research in Economics, Management and the Arts (CREMA).
    4. Sumaira Naz & Sumaira Rehman & Humaira Saqib, 2013. "The Relationship Between Job Satisfaction And Personality Trait Among Bank Employees," Far East Journal of Psychology and Business, Far East Research Centre, vol. 11(5), pages 57-72, June.
    5. repec:hal:wpaper:halshs-00590404 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Chau-kiu Cheung & Kwok Leung, 2010. "Ways that Social Change Predicts Personal Quality of Life," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 96(3), pages 459-477, May.
    7. Weiping Kostenko, 2009. "Does Labour Market Achievement Matter for the Wellbeing of Australian Immigrants? Culture and Gender Differences," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2009n21, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    8. Werner Bönte & Stefan Krabel, 2014. "You can’t always get what you want: Gender Differences in Job Satisfaction of University Graduates," Schumpeter Discussion Papers SDP14007, Universitätsbibliothek Wuppertal, University Library.
    9. Vani K. Borooah, 2009. "Comparing levels of job satisfaction in the countries of Western and Eastern Europe," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 30(4), pages 304-325, July.
    10. Clark, Andrew E., 2007. "Born To Be Mild? Cohort Effects Don’t (Fully) Explain Why Well-Being Is U-Shaped in Age," IZA Discussion Papers 3170, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    11. Temesgen Kifle, 2014. "Do Comparison Wages Play a Major Role in Determining Overall Job Satisfaction? Evidence from Australia," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 15(3), pages 613-638, June.

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