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Occupational segregation of Hispanics in U.S. metropolitan areas

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Author Info

  • Olga Alonso-Villar

    ()
    (Universidade de Vigo)

  • Carlos Gradin

    (Universidade de Vigo)

  • Coral del Rio

    (Universidade de Vigo)

Abstract

This paper quantifies the occupational segregation of Hispanics in the largest Hispanic enclaves of the U.S. Using a procedure based on propensity score, it also explores the role played by the characteristics of Hispanics in explaining the variation of segregation across metropolitan areas. The lowest conditional segregation generally appears in wellestablished immigrant gateways mainly located near the Mexican border. A regression analysis shows that segregation of Hispanic workers tends to be higher in relatively smaller and highly-educated labor markets, with a lower proportion of Hispanics, and in areas where they face cooler feelings from the rest of the population.

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File URL: http://www.ecineq.org/milano/WP/ECINEQ2012-242.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality in its series Working Papers with number 242.

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Length: 37 pages
Date of creation: Jan 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:inq:inqwps:ecineq2012-242

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Web page: http://www.ecineq.org
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Related research

Keywords: Occupational segregation; Hispanics; ethnicity; metropolitan areas; United States;

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References

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  1. Patrick Bayer & Robert McMillan & Kim Rueben, 2002. "What Drives Racial Segregation? New Evidence Using Census Microdata," Working Papers 02-26, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  2. Carlos Gradín & Coral del Río & Olga Alonso-Villar, 2011. "Occupational Segregation by Race and Ethnicity in the US: Differences across States," Working Papers 1102, Universidade de Vigo, Departamento de Economía Aplicada.
  3. Frédéric CHANTREUIL & Alain TRANNOY, 2011. "Inequality Decomposition Values," Annales d'Economie et de Statistique, ENSAE, issue 101-102, pages 13-36.
  4. Alonso-Villar, Olga & del Río, Coral, 2010. "Local versus overall segregation measures," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 60(1), pages 30-38, July.
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Cited by:
  1. Coral del Rio & Olga Alonso-Villar, 2014. "The Evolution of Occupational Segregation in the U.S., 1940-2010: The Gains and Losses of Gender-Race/Ethnicity Groups," Working Papers 323, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
  2. Coral del Río & Olga Alonso Villar, 2013. "Mujeres ante el empleo (y el desempleo) en el mercado laboral español," Working Papers 1305, Universidade de Vigo, Departamento de Economía Aplicada.

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