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Occupational segregation of Afro-Latinos

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  • Carlos Gradín

    ()
    (Universidade de Vigo)

Abstract

The goal of this study was to use census information to measure the level of occupational segregation of workers of African descent compared to whites in various Latin American countries. I further investigated the extent to which segregation levels can be accounted for by different factors, such as the impact of black-white inequalities on years of schooling or different age structures of the racial groups that are unevenly distributed across the countries. The results show that Afro-Latinos are generally highly segregated across occupations. However, while a large proportion of this segregation would not exist in Brazil and Ecuador if Afro-Latinos had attained the same education as whites, the proportion of occupational segregation explained by educational inequalities is much lower in Cuba, Puerto Rico, and Costa Rica. Further, occupational segregation would be even higher in most cases if the geographical distribution of black and white populations were similar across these countries.

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File URL: http://www.ecineq.org/milano/WP/ECINEQ2011-231.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality in its series Working Papers with number 231.

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Length: 24 pages
Date of creation: 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:inq:inqwps:ecineq2011-231

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Keywords: conditional occupational segregation; education; race and ethnicity; Afro-Latinos.;

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  1. Mercedes Sastre & Alain Trannoy, 2002. "Shapley inequality decomposition by factor components: Some methodological issues," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 9(1), pages 51-89, December.
  2. Frankel, David M. & Volij, Oscar, 2011. "Measuring school segregation," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 146(1), pages 1-38, January.
  3. Spriggs, William E & Williams, Rhonda M, 1996. "A Logit Decomposition Analysis of Occupational Segregation: Results for the 1970s and 1980s," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 78(2), pages 348-55, May.
  4. Randy P. Albelda, 1986. "Occupational segregation by race and gender, 1958û1981," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 39(3), pages 404-411, April.
  5. Frédéric CHANTREUIL & Alain TRANNOY, 2011. "Inequality Decomposition Values," Annales d'Economie et de Statistique, ENSAE, issue 101-102, pages 13-36.
  6. Mary King, 2009. "Occupational Segregation by Race and Sex in Brazil, 1989-2001," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer, vol. 36(2), pages 113-125, June.
  7. Thomas Lemieux, 2002. "Decomposing changes in wage distributions: a unified approach," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 35(4), pages 646-688, November.
  8. Mercedes Sastre & Alain Trannoy, 2002. "Shapley inequality decomposition by factor components: Some methodological issues," Journal of Economics, Springer, vol. 77(1), pages 51-89, December.
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