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Can International Migration Ever Be Made a Pareto Improvement?

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  • Gabriel J Felbermayr

    ()

  • Wilhelm Kohler

    ()

Abstract

We argue that compensating losers is more difficult for immigration than for trade and capital movements. While a tax-cum-subsidy mechanism allows the government to turn the gains from trade into a Pareto improvement, the same is not true for the so-called immigration surplus, if the redistributive mechanism is not allowed to discriminate against migrants. We discuss policy conclusions to be drawn from this fundamental asymmetry between migration and other forms of globalization.

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File URL: http://www.uni-hohenheim.de/RePEc/hoh/papers/305.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Department of Economics, University of Hohenheim, Germany in its series Diskussionspapiere aus dem Institut für Volkswirtschaftslehre der Universität Hohenheim with number 305/2009.

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Length: 23 pages
Date of creation: 2009
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hoh:hohdip:305

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Keywords: Gravity model; international trade; international migration; cross-country income regression;

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References

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  1. Wellisch, Dietmar & Walz, Uwe, 1998. "Why do rich countries prefer free trade over free migration? The role of the modern welfare state," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 42(8), pages 1595-1612, September.
  2. Stark, Oded & Wang, Yong, 2001. "Inducing Human Capital Formation: Migration as a Substitute for Subsidies," Economics Series 100, Institute for Advanced Studies.
  3. Borjas, George J., 1999. "The economic analysis of immigration," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 28, pages 1697-1760 Elsevier.
  4. Timothy J. Hatton, 2007. "Should we have a WTO for international migration?," Economic Policy, CEPR & CES & MSH, vol. 22, pages 339-383, 04.
  5. Calvo, Guillermo & Wellisz, Stanislaw, 1983. "International factor mobility and national advantage," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(1-2), pages 103-114, February.
  6. Tito Boeri & Herbert Brücker, 2005. "Why are Europeans so tough on migrants?," Economic Policy, CEPR & CES & MSH, vol. 20(44), pages 629-703, October.
  7. L. Alan Winters & Terrie L. Walmsley & Zhen Kun Wang & Roman Grynberg, 2003. "Liberalising Temporary Movement of Natural Persons: An Agenda for the Development Round," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 26(8), pages 1137-1161, 08.
  8. Felbermayr, Gabriel & Kohler, Wilhelm K., 2007. "Immigration and native welfare," Munich Reprints in Economics 20608, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  9. Richard B. Freeman, 2006. "People Flows in Globalization," NBER Working Papers 12315, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Markusen, James R., 1983. "Factor movements and commodity trade as complements," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(3-4), pages 341-356, May.
  11. Jagdish Bhagwati & Arvind Panagariya & T. N. Srinivasan, 2004. "The Muddles over Outsourcing," International Trade 0408004, EconWPA.
  12. Peter J. Hammond & Jaime Sempere, . "Gains from Trade versus Gains from Migration: What Makes Them So Different?," Working Papers 98012, Stanford University, Department of Economics.
  13. Kohler, Wilhelm K., 2004. "Eastern Enlargement of the EU : A Comprehensive Welfare Assessment," HWWA Discussion Papers 260, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWA).
  14. George J. Borjas, 1995. "The Economic Benefits from Immigration," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 9(2), pages 3-22, Spring.
  15. Davidson, Carl & Matusz, Steven J. & Nelson, Douglas R., 2007. "Can compensation save free trade?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(1), pages 167-186, March.
  16. Kohler, Wilhelm, 2004. "Eastern enlargement of the EU: a comprehensive welfare assessment," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 26(7), pages 865-888, October.
  17. Dixit, Avinash & Norman, Victor, 1986. "Gains from trade without lump-sum compensation," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(1-2), pages 111-122, August.
  18. Willmann, Gerald, 2004. "Pareto gains from trade: a dynamic counterexample," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 83(2), pages 199-204, May.
  19. Ruffin, Roy J., 1984. "International factor movements," Handbook of International Economics, in: R. W. Jones & P. B. Kenen (ed.), Handbook of International Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 5, pages 237-288 Elsevier.
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As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Can migration be Pareto optimal?
    by Economic Logician in Economic Logic on 2009-07-29 14:40:00

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