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Are migrants more skilled than non-migrants? Repeat, return, and same-employer migrants

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  • Jennifer Hunt

Abstract

I examine the determinants of inter-state migration of adults within western Germany, using the German Socio-Economic Panel from 1984-2000. Migrants who do not change employers represent one-fifth of all migrants and have higher education and pre-move wages than non-migrants. Skilled workers thus have a low-cost migration avenue that has not been considered in the previous literature. Other migrants are heterogeneous and not unambiguously more skilled than non-migrants. I confirm that long-distance migrants are more skilled than short-distance migrants, as predicted by theory, and I show that return migrants are a mix of successes and failures. Most repeat migration is return migration.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Canadian Economics Association in its journal Canadian Journal of Economics.

Volume (Year): 37 (2004)
Issue (Month): 4 (November)
Pages: 830-849

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Handle: RePEc:cje:issued:v:37:y:2004:i:4:p:830-849

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