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The Role of Coal Mine Regulation in Regional Development

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  • Xu, Hangtian
  • Nakajima, Kentaro

Abstract

In response to the high mortality rates and low productivity in coal mining, China began regulating coal mines in the 1990s, which has reshaped its coal economy. We empirically investigate the relationship between coal mine regulation and economic growth in China. Using two difference-in-difference approaches to compare the pre- and post-regulation periods, as well as regions with and without rich coal endowment, we find that regulation positively affects regional economy. This result is further illustrated using an OLS estimation that uses mortality rate in coal mining as a proxy for measuring the quality of regulation. The impacts are not limited only to the intra-coal industry but also spillover to the economy of related regions by relieving the crowding-out effects of coal abundance, that is, resource abundance tends to crowd out investment, human capital and innovation in non-resource sectors and thus hinders economic growth.

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File URL: http://hermes-ir.lib.hit-u.ac.jp/rs/bitstream/10086/25903/1/No45-dp.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University in its series PRIMCED Discussion Paper Series with number 45.

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Length: 42 p.
Date of creation: Sep 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hit:primdp:45

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Keywords: coal mine regulation; crowding-out effects; mortality rate; resource curse; regional development;

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