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The Impact of Gender Inequality in Education and Employment on Economic Growth in Developing Countries: Updates and Extensions

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Abstract

Using cross-country and panel regressions, we investigate to what extent gender gaps in education and employment (proxied using gender gaps in labor force participation) reduce economic growth. Using most recent data and investigating a long time period (1960-2000), we update the results of previous studies on education gaps on growth and extend the analysis to employment gaps using panel data. We find that gender gaps in education and employment significantly reduce economic growth. The combined ‘costs’ of education and employment gaps in Middle East and North Africa and South Asia amount respectively to 0.9-1.7 and 0.1- 1.6 percentage point differences in growth compared to East Asia. Gender gaps in employment appear to have an increasing effect on economic growth differences between regions, with the Middle East and North Africa and South Asia suffering from slower growth in female employment.

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Paper provided by Ibero-America Institute for Economic Research in its series Ibero America Institute for Econ. Research (IAI) Discussion Papers with number 175.

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Length: 39 pages
Date of creation: 10 Sep 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:got:iaidps:175

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Keywords: gender inequality; growth; education; employment; discrimination;

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References

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Cited by:
  1. Thomas Schober & Rudolf Winter-Ebmer, 2009. "Gender Wage Inequality and Economic Growth: Is there Really a Puzzle?," NRN working papers 2009-08, The Austrian Center for Labor Economics and the Analysis of the Welfare State, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
  2. Branisa, Boris & Klasen, Stephan & Ziegler, Maria, 2010. "Why we should all care about social institutions related to gender inequality," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Hannover 2010 50, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.
  3. Boris Branisa & Stephan Klasen & Maria Ziegler, 2009. "New Measures of Gender Inequality: The Social Institutions and Gender Index (SIGI)and its Subindices," Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 10, Courant Research Centre PEG.
  4. Wokia-azi N. Kumase & Herve Bisseleua & Stephan Klasen, 2010. "Opportunities and constraints in agriculture: A gendered analysis of cocoa production in Southern Cameroon," Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 27, Courant Research Centre PEG.

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