Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

A Growth Model with Gender Inequality in Employment, Human Capital, and Socio-Political Participation

Contents:

Author Info

  • Thomas Bassetti

    ()

  • Donata Favaro

    ()

Abstract

This paper proposes an endogenous growth model in which gender inequality in employment has an important role in explaining different development dimensions such as socio-political participation, educational attainments, and working hours, in developed countries. Starting from a theoretical framework à la Lucas, we model the decision to participate in determining a society’s values as a game in which the existence of gender inequalities in the labor market may affect the time spent by men and women in social activities. Although we assume gender inequality and population growth to be exogenous factors, relationships among our main variables become extremely complex. Our model’s predictions are in line with some stylized facts observed in developed economies, in particular across the European regions: more equal societies have higher socio-political participation, devote less time to work, and present higher educational attainments and rates of economic growth than less equal ones. Our model’s main policy implications are immediate: political interventions designed to promote female employment must be accompanied by pro-family policies in order to sustain economic growth and improve quality of life, by reducing time for work and increasing time for other activities.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.child-centre.unito.it/papers/child14_2011.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by CHILD - Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic economics - ITALY in its series CHILD Working Papers with number wp14_11.

as in new window
Length: 35 pages
Date of creation: Jul 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wpc:wplist:wp14_11

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Via Po 53 10124 Turin
Phone: 39-011=6702726
Fax: 39-011-6702762
Email:
Web page: http://www.child-centre.it/
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: Economic development; gender inequality; time allocation; socio-political participation;

Find related papers by JEL classification:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-42, July.
  2. Brad Sturgill, 2010. "Cross-country Variation in Factor Shares and its Implications for Development Accounting," 2010 Meeting Papers 152, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  3. Rachel Croson & Uri Gneezy, 2009. "Gender Differences in Preferences," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 47(2), pages 448-74, June.
  4. Stephen Knowles & Paula K. Lorgelly, 2002. "Are educational gender gaps a brake on economic development? Some cross-country empirical evidence," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 54(1), pages 118-149, January.
  5. Seguino, Stephanie, 2000. "Gender Inequality and Economic Growth: A Cross-Country Analysis," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 28(7), pages 1211-1230, July.
  6. Cavalcanti, Tiago & Tavares, José, 2007. "The Output Cost of Gender Discrimination: A Model-Based Macroeconomic Estimate," CEPR Discussion Papers 6477, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  7. Gundlach, Erich, 1997. "Openness and economic growth in developing countries," Open Access Publications from Kiel Institute for the World Economy 1723, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
  8. Stephan Klasen & Francesca Lamanna, 2009. "The Impact of Gender Inequality in Education and Employment on Economic Growth: New Evidence for a Panel of Countries," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(3), pages 91-132.
  9. Antonio Ladron de Guevara & Salvador Ortigueira & Manuel S. Santos, 1994. "Equilibrium Dynamics in Two-Sector Models of Endogenous Growth," Working Papers 9403, Centro de Investigacion Economica, ITAM.
  10. Paula K. Lorgelly & P. Dorian Owen, 1999. "The effect of female and male schooling on economic growth in the Barro-Lee model," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 24(3), pages 537-557.
  11. M. Anne Hill & Elizabeth King, 1995. "Women's education and economic well-being," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(2), pages 21-46.
  12. Galor, Oded & Weil, David, 1995. "The Gender Gap, Fertility and Growth," CEPR Discussion Papers 1157, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  13. Stephanie Seguino & Maria Sagrario Floro, 2003. "Does Gender have any Effect on Aggregate Saving? An empirical analysis," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(2), pages 147-166.
  14. George A. Akerlof & Rachel E. Kranton, 2000. "Economics And Identity," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 115(3), pages 715-753, August.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wpc:wplist:wp14_11. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Silvia Landorno).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.