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The effect of female and male schooling on economic growth in the Barro-Lee model

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  • Paula K. Lorgelly

    ()
    (Department of Economics, University of Otago, PO Box 56, Dunedin, New Zealand)

  • P. Dorian Owen

    ()
    (Department of Economics, University of Otago, PO Box 56, Dunedin, New Zealand)

Abstract

Barro and Lee (1994), in an influential empirical study of the determinants of economic growth, find that, whereas growth is positively related to male schooling, it is negatively related to female schooling. Stokey (1994) has suggested that this is largely due to the influence of four Asian countries (Hong Kong, Singapore, Taiwan and Korea) that have very high levels of growth but very low levels of female schooling, and that deleting the female education variable would cast doubt on the statistical significance of the male education variable. Deletion diagnostics and partial scatter plots are analysed to identify influential observations. The sensitivity of the Barro-Lee results to deleting selected countries from the sample and deleting female education from their growth equations is then examined. The results obtained point to the fragile nature of both the significant negative effect of female education and the significant positive effect of male education in the Barro-Lee model.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal Empirical Economics.

Volume (Year): 24 (1999)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 537-557

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Handle: RePEc:spr:empeco:v:24:y:1999:i:3:p:537-557

Note: received: September 1996/Final version received: December 1998
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Related research

Keywords: Male education · female education · economic growth · influential observations;

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Cited by:
  1. Abu-Ghaida, Dina & Klasen, Stephan, 2004. "The Costs of Missing the Millennium Development Goal on Gender Equity," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(7), pages 1075-1107, July.
  2. Christian Bjørnskov, 2005. "Does Political Ideology Affect Economic Growth?," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 123(1), pages 133-146, April.
  3. Stephan Klasen, 2006. "Pro-Poor Growth and Gender Inequality," Ibero America Institute for Econ. Research (IAI) Discussion Papers 151, Ibero-America Institute for Economic Research.
  4. Stephan Klasen & Francesca Lamanna, 2008. "The Impact of Gender Inequality in Education and Employment on Economic Growth in Developing Countries: Updates and Extensions," Ibero America Institute for Econ. Research (IAI) Discussion Papers 175, Ibero-America Institute for Economic Research.
  5. Thomas Bassetti & Donata Favaro, 2011. "A Growth Model with Gender Inequality in Employment, Human Capital, and Socio-Political Participation," CHILD Working Papers wp14_11, CHILD - Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic economics - ITALY.
  6. Aysit Tansel & Nil Demet Gungor, 2012. "Gender Effects of Education on Economic Development in Turkey," ERC Working Papers 1203, ERC - Economic Research Center, Middle East Technical University, revised Apr 2012.
  7. Mark Rogers, 2003. "A Survey of Economic Growth," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 79(244), pages 112-135, 03.
  8. Berggren, Niclas & Elinder, Mikael & Jordahl, Henrik, 2007. "Trust and Growth: A Shaky Relationship," Working Paper Series 705, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
  9. Angel de la Fuente & Antonio Ciccone, 2003. "Human capital in a global and knowledge-based economy," Working Papers 70, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
  10. Himanshu Sekhar, Rout & Prasant Kumar, Panda, 2007. "Gender And Development: Dimensions And Strategies – Introduction And Overview," MPRA Paper 6559, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  11. Kamakshya Trivedi, 2006. "Educational human capital and levels of income: Evidence from states in India, 1965�-�92," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(8), pages 1350-1378.
  12. Bjørnskov, Christian, 2004. "Inequality, Tolerance, and Growth," Working Papers 04-8, University of Aarhus, Aarhus School of Business, Department of Economics.
  13. Knowles, Stephen, 2001. "Inequality and Economic Growth: The Empirical Relationship Reconsidered in the Light of Comparable Data," Working Paper Series UNU-WIDER Research Paper , World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

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