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Does Gender have any Effect on Aggregate Saving? An empirical analysis

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  • Stephanie Seguino
  • Maria Sagrario Floro

Abstract

This study investigates the effects of gender on aggregate saving. We test the hypothesis that shifts in women's relative income, which can affect their bargaining power within the household, have a discernible impact on household saving and, by extension, gross domestic saving, due to differing saving propensities by gender. The empirical analysis is based on panel data for a set of semi-industrialised economies, covering the period 1975-95. The results indicate that, as some measures of women's relative income and bargaining power increase, gross domestic saving rates rise. The implied gender disparity in saving propensities may be linked to differences in saving motives based on gender roles, and well as divergent experiences of economic vulnerability. These findings suggest the importance of understanding gender differences in planning for savings mobilisation and in the formulation of financial and investment policies.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal International Review of Applied Economics.

Volume (Year): 17 (2003)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 147-166

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Handle: RePEc:taf:irapec:v:17:y:2003:i:2:p:147-166

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References

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  12. Mark M. Pitt & Shahidur R. Khandker, 1998. "The Impact of Group-Based Credit Programs on Poor Households in Bangladesh: Does the Gender of Participants Matter?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 106(5), pages 958-996, October.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Filippo Pericoli & Luigi Ventura, 2012. "Family dissolution and precautionary savings: an empirical analysis," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 10(4), pages 573-595, December.
  2. Oriana Bandiera & Ashwini Natraj, 2013. "Does Gender Inequality Hinder Development and Economic Growth? Evidence and Policy Implications," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 28(1), pages 2-21, February.
  3. Thomas Gries & Ha van Dung, 2014. "Household Savings and Productive Capital Formation in Rural Vietnam: Insurance vs. Social Network," Working Papers CIE 81, University of Paderborn, CIE Center for International Economics.
  4. Stephan Klasen & Francesca Lamanna, 2008. "The Impact of Gender Inequality in Education and Employment on Economic Growth in Developing Countries: Updates and Extensions," Ibero America Institute for Econ. Research (IAI) Discussion Papers 175, Ibero-America Institute for Economic Research.
  5. Stephanie Seguino, 2005. "All types of inequality are not created equal: divergent impacts of inequality on economic growth," Working Papers 10, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, revised Oct 2005.
  6. Signe Krogstrup & Sébastien Wälti, 2007. "Women and Budget Deficits," IHEID Working Papers 13-2007, Economics Section, The Graduate Institute of International Studies, revised Apr 2007.
  7. Baliamoune-Lutz, Mina, 2013. "The effectiveness of foreign aid to women.s equality organizations in the MENA: Does aid promote women.s political participation?," Working Paper Series UNU-WIDER Research Paper , World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  8. Shoshana Amyra Grossbard & Alfredo Marvao Pereira, 2010. "Will Women Save more than Men? A Theoretical Model of Savings and Marriage," CESifo Working Paper Series 3146, CESifo Group Munich.
  9. Thomas Bassetti & Donata Favaro, 2011. "A Growth Model with Gender Inequality in Employment, Human Capital, and Socio-Political Participation," CHILD Working Papers wp14_11, CHILD - Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic economics - ITALY.
  10. Seguino, Stephanie, 2011. "Gender Inequality and Economic Growth: A Reply to Schober and Winter-Ebmer," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(8), pages 1485-1487, August.
  11. Cagatay, Nilüfer & Ertürk, Korkuk, 2004. "Gender and globalization : a macroeconomic perspective," ILO Working Papers 370974, International Labour Organization.
  12. Stephanie Seguino, 2008. "Gender, Distribution, and Balance of Payments (revised 10/08)," Working Papers wp133_revised, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
  13. Schober, Thomas & Winter-Ebmer, Rudolf, 2009. "Gender Wage Inequality and Economic Growth: Is There Really a Puzzle?," IZA Discussion Papers 4323, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  14. Shoshana Amyra Grossbard & Alfredo Marvão Pereira, 2013. "Savings and Economies of Marriage: Intra-Marriage Financial Distributions as Determinants of Savings," Working Papers 95, Department of Economics, College of William and Mary.
  15. Seguino, Stephanie, 2003. "Taking gender differences in bargaining power seriously: Equity, labor standards, and living wages," MPRA Paper 6508, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Oct 2003.
  16. Schober, Thomas & Winter-Ebmer, Rudolf, 2011. "Gender Wage Inequality and Economic Growth: Is There Really a Puzzle?--A Comment," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(8), pages 1476-1484, August.

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