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Inequality and growth

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  • CEESAY, EBRIMA K.

Abstract

Abstract The paper study cross country analysis for 18 countries to see the effects of gender inequality in education (human capita proxy), Labor force participation (employment proxy) and its impacts on constant growth of Gdp. The regressions are run individual country at a time. The approach is necessary and sufficient conditions to identify the determinants of inequality of each country and the effects on country’s growth from 1980 to 2010.The results Shaw that in most countries if we control the direct impacts of gender inequality like openness, pop-growth, and investment, the labor force participation female-male ratios have highest impacts on growth than others employment variables. The results also found out that education with secondary female-male ratios have greater impacts on growth compared to education with tertiary female-male ratios. Another important point to note is that in most of these 18 countries of the world their appeared a problems of collinearity in employment data. This is due to the facts that employment data’s are insufficient. Overall, the finding needs further research, but the final results after checking in sampling and outer sampling approaches is that educational impacts on growth is high except for only one employment variable(i.e. LFPFM) have the highest impacts on growth in most of the 18 countries in our analysis.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 45492.

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Date of creation: 25 Mar 2013
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:45492

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Keywords: Determinants of inequality; Education; Labor force participations; sampling approaches; Discriminations; Necessary and sufficient conditions for economic growth.;

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  1. William A. Darity & Patrick L. Mason, 1998. "Evidence on Discrimination in Employment: Codes of Color, Codes of Gender," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 12(2), pages 63-90, Spring.
  2. Paul Collier & Jan Willem Gunning, 1999. "Why Has Africa Grown Slowly?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 13(3), pages 3-22, Summer.
  3. Galor, Oded & Weil, David N, 1996. "The Gender Gap, Fertility, and Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(3), pages 374-87, June.
  4. Blecker, Robert A & Seguino, Stephanie, 2002. "Macroeconomic Effects of Reducing Gender Wage Inequality in an Export-Oriented, Semi-industrialized Economy," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 6(1), pages 103-19, February.
  5. Berta Esteve-Volart, 2004. "Gender Discrimination and Growth: Theory and Evidence from India," STICERD - Development Economics Papers - From 2008 this series has been superseded by Economic Organisation and Public Policy Discussion Papers 42, Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines, LSE.
  6. Baldwin, Marjorie & Johnson, William G, 1992. "Estimating the Employment Effects of Wage Discrimination," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 74(3), pages 446-55, August.
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