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Incentives to Provide Local Public Goods: Fiscal Federalism, Russian Style

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  • Zhuravskaya Ekatherina

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Abstract

Based on unique data set on Russian city budgets, this paper shows that revenue sharing between regional and local governments provides local governments with no incentive to increase tax base or provide public goods. Any change in local government’s own revenues is almost entirely offset by changes in shared revenues. This leads to governmental over-regulation of private businesses. It is shown that fiscal incentives are a determinant of the formation of private business and the efficiency of public goods provision. The Russian federalism is compared to Chinese federalism, where fiscal incentives reputedly are stronger in many provinces.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by EERC Research Network, Russia and CIS in its series EERC Working Paper Series with number 99-15e.

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Length: 42 pages
Date of creation: 11 Oct 2000
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:eer:wpalle:99-15e

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Postal: EERC Research Network, Russia and CIS, 1, Mazepy Str., suite 202, Kyiv, 01010 Ukraine
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Keywords: Federalism; Russia; local government; transition;

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  1. Yingyi Qian & Barry R. Weingast, 1997. "Federalism as a Commitment to Reserving Market Incentives," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 11(4), pages 83-92, Fall.
  2. Philippe Aghion & Oliver D. Hart & John Moore, 1994. "The Economics of Bankruptcy Reform," NBER Chapters, in: The Transition in Eastern Europe, Volume 2: Restructuring, pages 215-244 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Simon Johnson, 2000. "Tunneling," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(2), pages 22-27, May.
  4. Gerard Roland & Thierry Verdier, 1997. "Transition and the Output Fall," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 37, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  5. Simon Johnson & Daniel Kaufman & Andrei Shleifer, 1997. "The Unofficial Economy in Transition," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 28(2), pages 159-240.
  6. John Knight & Li Shi, 1999. "Fiscal decentralization: Incentives, redistribution and reform in China," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(1), pages 5-32.
  7. Shleifer, Andrei, 1997. "Government in transition," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 41(3-5), pages 385-410, April.
  8. Clifford Gaddy & Barry W. Ickes, 1998. "To Restructure or Not to Restructure: Informal Activities and Enterprise Behavior in Transition," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 134, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  9. A. Lavrov, 1996. "Fiscal Federalism and Financial Stabilization," Problems of Economic Transition, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 39(1), pages 83-94, May.
  10. Shleifer, Andrei & Vishny, Robert W, 1994. "Politicians and Firms," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 109(4), pages 995-1025, November.
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