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School Choice and Quality

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  • Checchi, Daniele
  • Jappelli, Tullio

Abstract

The 1993 Survey of Household Income and Wealth, a large cross-section of the Italian population covering 24,000 individuals, reports detailed information on children’s attendance of public and private schools and parents’ assessments of the quality of public schools in the city of residence. The survey also provides detailed information on the household’s demographic structure, income and parents’ education. The empirical analysis indicates that the quality of schools is one of the driving factors in the choice between private and public schools. The results are robust with respect to the particular quality indicator used and the presence of fixed provincial effects.

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Paper provided by C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 4748.

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Date of creation: Nov 2004
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Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:4748

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Keywords: school choice;

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References

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  1. Eric A. Hanushek, 2002. "Publicly Provided Education," NBER Working Papers 8799, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Glomm, Gerhard & Ravikumar, B, 1992. "Public versus Private Investment in Human Capital Endogenous Growth and Income Inequality," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(4), pages 818-34, August.
  3. Daniela Del Boca, 2002. "The effect of child care and part time opportunities on participation and fertility decisions in Italy," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, Springer, vol. 15(3), pages 549-573.
  4. Fershtman, C. & Murphy, K.M., 1993. "Social Status, Education and Growth," Papers, Tel Aviv 8-93, Tel Aviv.
  5. Gradstein, Mark & Justman, Moshe, 2001. "Public Education and the Melting Pot," CEPR Discussion Papers, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers 2924, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  6. Neal, Derek, 1997. "The Effects of Catholic Secondary Schooling on Educational Achievement," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 15(1), pages 98-123, January.
  7. Buddin, Richard J. & Cordes, Joseph J. & Kirby, Sheila Nataraj, 1998. "School Choice in California: Who Chooses Private Schools?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(1), pages 110-134, July.
  8. Evans, William N & Schwab, Robert M, 1995. "Finishing High School and Starting College: Do Catholic Schools Make a Difference?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, MIT Press, vol. 110(4), pages 941-74, November.
  9. Stiglitz, J. E., 1974. "The demand for education in public and private school systems," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 3(4), pages 349-385, November.
  10. Lankford R. H. & Lee E. S. & Wyckoff J. H., 1995. "An Analysis of Elementary and Secondary School Choice," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 236-251, September.
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Cited by:
  1. Hamna Ahmed & Sahar Amjad & Masooma Habib & Syed Ahsan Shah, 2013. "Determinants of School Choice:Evidence from Rural Punjab, Pakistan," CREB Working papers 1-2013, Centre for Research in Economics and Business, The Lahore School of Economics, revised 2013.
  2. Francisco Gallego & Andrés Hernando, 2009. "School Choice in Chile: Looking at the Demand Side," Documentos de Trabajo, Instituto de Economia. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. 356, Instituto de Economia. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile..
  3. Paola Giuliano, 2008. "Culture and the Family: An Application to Educational Choices in Italy," Rivista di Politica Economica, SIPI Spa, SIPI Spa, vol. 98(4), pages 3-38, July-Augu.
  4. Lorenzo Cappellari, 2004. "High school types, academic performance and early labour market outcomes," CHILD Working Papers, CHILD - Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic economics - ITALY wp03_04, CHILD - Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic economics - ITALY.

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