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Family Effects in Youth Employment

In: The Youth Labor Market Problem: Its Nature, Causes, and Consequences

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Author Info

  • Albert Rees
  • Wayne Gray

Abstract

The authors begin with the hypothesis that parental contacts play a major role in finding jobs for youth. This hypothesis is tested with a model of youth employment that includes characteristics of other family members in addition to a large set of control variables. Particular attention is paid to parental characteristics that might indicate a parent's ability to assist the youth in finding a job, including occupation, industry and education. The effects of such variables are generally not significant and do not support the initial hypothesis. However, the employment probability of a youth is significantly affected by the presence of employed siblings, indicating the presence of some intrafamily effects.

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Bibliographic Info

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This chapter was published in:

  • Richard B. Freeman & David A. Wise, 1982. "The Youth Labor Market Problem: Its Nature, Causes, and Consequences," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number free82-1.
    This item is provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Chapters with number 7893.

    Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:7893

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    Cited by:
    1. Mariana Marchionni & Germán Bet & Ana Pacheco, 2007. "Empleo, Educación y Entorno Social de los Jóvenes: Una Nueva Fuente de Información," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0061, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
    2. Alan L. Gustman & Thomas L. Steinmeier, 1979. "The Impact of the Market and the Family on Youth Employment and Labor Supply," NBER Working Papers 0415, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. María Angeles Davia & Oscar D. Marcenaro Gutiérrez, 2008. "Exploring the link between employment search time and reservation," Hacienda Pública Española, IEF, vol. 186(3), pages 91-121, October.
    4. Amy Peng & Ling Yang, 2009. "The Decision of Work and Study and Employment Outcomes," Working Papers 014, Ryerson University, Department of Economics.
    5. Lisa M. Lynch, 1986. "The Youth Labor Market in the 80s: Determinants of Re-Employment Probabilities for Young Men and Women," NBER Working Papers 2021, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Harry J. Holzer, 1986. "Search Method Use by Unemployed Youth," NBER Working Papers 1859, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Namkee Ahn & Arantza Ugidos, 1996. "The effects of the labor market situation of parents on children: inheritance of unemployment," Investigaciones Economicas, Fundación SEPI, vol. 20(1), pages 23-41, January.
    8. Dario Pozzoli, 2009. "The Transition to Work for Italian University Graduates," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 23(1), pages 131-169, 03.
    9. Lassibille, Gerard & Navarro Gomez, Lucia & Aguilar Ramos, Isabel & de la O Sanchez, Carolina, 2001. "Youth transition from school to work in Spain," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 139-149, April.
    10. Sabrina Wulff Pabilonia, 2000. "The Role of the Family in Determining Youth Employment," JCPR Working Papers 151, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research.
    11. Holzer, Harry J, 1987. "Informal Job Search and Black Youth Unemployment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 77(3), pages 446-52, June.
    12. Fernando Coloma & Bernardita Vial, 2003. "Desempleo e Inactividad Juvenil en Chile," Latin American Journal of Economics-formerly Cuadernos de Economía, Instituto de Economía. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile., vol. 40(119), pages 149-171.
    13. Lars Behrenz, 2001. "Who Gets The Job And Why? An Explorative Study Of Employers’ Recruitment Behavior," Journal of Applied Economics, Universidad del CEMA, vol. 0, pages 255-278, November.

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