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Aircraft Noise, Health, And Residential Sorting: Evidence From Two Quasi‐Experiments

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  • Stefan Boes
  • Stephan Nüesch
  • Steven Stillman

Abstract

We explore two unexpected changes in flight regulations to identify the causal effect of aircraft noise on health. Detailed yearly noise metrics are linked with panel data on health outcomes using exact address information. Controlling for individual and spatial heterogeneity, we find that aircraft noise significantly increases sleeping problems, weariness and headaches. Our pooled models substantially underestimate the detrimental health effects, which suggests that individuals self-select into residence based on their unobserved noise sensitivity and idiosyncratic vulnerability. Generally, we show that the combination of fixed effects and quasi-experiments is very powerful to identify causal effects in epidemiological field studies.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/hec.2948
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Health Economics.

Volume (Year): 22 (2013)
Issue (Month): 9 (09)
Pages: 1037-1051

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Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:22:y:2013:i:9:p:1037-1051

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Web page: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5749

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  1. Oswald, A.J., 1997. "Happiness and Economic Performance," Papers 18, Centre for Economic Performance & Institute of Economics.
  2. Ada Ferrer-i-Carbonell & Bernard M. S. van Praag, 2001. "The Subjective Costs of Health Losses Due to Chronic Diseases: An Alternative Model for Monetary Appraisal," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 262, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
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  4. Neidell, Matthew J., 2004. "Air pollution, health, and socio-economic status: the effect of outdoor air quality on childhood asthma," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(6), pages 1209-1236, November.
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  7. Greenstone, Michael & Gayer, Ted, 2009. "Quasi-experimental and experimental approaches to environmental economics," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 57(1), pages 21-44, January.
  8. Lucas W. Davis, 2004. "The Effect of Health Risk on Housing Values: Evidence from a Cancer Cluster," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(5), pages 1693-1704, December.
  9. Wim Groot & Henri�tte Maassen van den Brink, 2006. "The compensating income variation of cardiovascular disease," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(10), pages 1143-1148.
  10. Emmanouil Mentzakis, 2011. "Allowing for heterogeneity in monetary subjective well‐being valuations," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(3), pages 331-347, March.
  11. Christopher F. Parmeter & Jaren C. Pope, 2012. "Quasi-Experiments and Hedonic Property Value Methods," Working Papers 2012-7, University of Miami, Department of Economics.
  12. Black, Deborah A. & Black, John A. & Issarayangyun, Tharit & Samuels, Stephen E., 2007. "Aircraft noise exposure and resident's stress and hypertension: A public health perspective for airport environmental management," Journal of Air Transport Management, Elsevier, vol. 13(5), pages 264-276.
  13. Boes, Stefan & Nüesch, Stephan, 2011. "Quasi-experimental evidence on the effect of aircraft noise on apartment rents," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(2), pages 196-204, March.
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