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Flexibility of Household Structure: Child Fostering Decisions in Burkina Faso

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  • Richard Akresh

Abstract

Using data I collected in Africa, this paper examines a household’s decision to adjust its size through child fostering, an institution where biological parents temporarily send children to live with other families. Households experiencing negative idiosyncratic income shocks, child gender imbalances, located further from primary schools, or with more "good" quality network members (fewer subsistence farmers and unmarried individuals and more educated members) are significantly more likely to send a child. Results reject an overall symmetric fostering model across senders and receivers, but evidence of symmetry is found when the test is restricted to exogenous income shocks and gender imbalances.

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File URL: http://jhr.uwpress.org/cgi/reprint/44/4/976
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Wisconsin Press in its journal Journal of Human Resources.

Volume (Year): 44 (2009)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages:

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Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:44:y:2009:i4:p976-997

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Web page: http://jhr.uwpress.org/

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Cited by:
  1. Angelucci, Manuela & De Giorgi, Giacomo & Rangel, Marcos A. & Rasul, Imran, 2010. "Family networks and school enrolment: Evidence from a randomized social experiment," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(3-4), pages 197-221, April.
  2. Delpierre, Matthieu & Verheyden, Bertrand & Weynants, Stephanie, 2012. "On the interaction between risk-taking and risk-sharing under farm household wealth heterogeneity," 123rd Seminar, February 23-24, 2012, Dublin, Ireland 122556, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
  3. Beaman, Lori & Dillon, Andrew, 2012. "Do household definitions matter in survey design? Results from a randomized survey experiment in Mali," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 98(1), pages 124-135.
  4. Abla Safir, 2009. "Who leaves, who moves in? The impact of positive and negative income shocks on migration in Senegal," Working Papers halshs-00585955, HAL.
  5. Richard Akresh & Eric V. Edmonds, 2011. "Residential Rivalry and Constraints on the Availability of Child Labor," NBER Working Papers 17165, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Akresh, Richard & Lucchetti, Leonardo & Thirumurthy, Harsha, 2011. "Wars and Child Health: Evidence from the Eritrean-Ethiopian Conflict," IZA Discussion Papers 5558, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. Beaman, Lori & Dillon, Andrew, 2010. "Do household definitions matter in survey design?," IFPRI discussion papers 1009, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  8. Oriana Bandiera & Robin Burgess & Selim Gulesci & Imran Rasul, 2009. "Community Networks and PovertyReductionProgrammes: Evidence from Bangladesh," STICERD - Economic Organisation and Public Policy Discussion Papers Series 015, Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines, LSE.
  9. Dillon, Andrew, 2008. "Child labor and schooling responses to production and health shocks in northern Mali:," IFPRI discussion papers 755, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  10. Richard Akresh & Damien de Walque & Harounan Kazianga, 2013. "Cash Transfers and Child Schooling: Evidence from a Randomized Evaluation of the Role of Conditionality," Economics Working Paper Series 1301, Oklahoma State University, Department of Economics and Legal Studies in Business.
  11. Akresh, Richard & de Walque, Damien & Kazianga, Harounan, 2012. "Alternative cash transfer delivery mechanisms : impacts on routine preventative health clinic visits in Burkina Faso," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5958, The World Bank.
  12. Akresh, Richard & Edmonds, Eric V., 2010. "The Analytical Returns to Measuring a Detailed Household Roster," IZA Discussion Papers 4759, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  13. Legrand Yémélé Kana & Sylvain Dessy & Jacques Ewoudou, 2010. "Are Foster Children Made Better Off by Informal Fostering Arrangements?," Cahiers de recherche 1009, CIRPEE.
  14. Beck, Simon & De Vreyer, Philippe & Lambert, Sylvie & Marazyan, Karine & Safir, Abla, 2014. "Child Fostering in Senegal," CEPREMAP Working Papers (Docweb) 1403, CEPREMAP.

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