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Human capital accumulation, fertility and economic development

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  • Akira Yakita

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal Journal of Economics.

Volume (Year): 99 (2010)
Issue (Month): 2 (March)
Pages: 97-116

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Handle: RePEc:kap:jeczfn:v:99:y:2010:i:2:p:97-116

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Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=108909

Related research

Keywords: Human capital; Fertility; Development trap; Economic development; School education; I21; J13; O11;

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References

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  1. Oded_Galor, 2004. "From Stagnation to Growth:Unified Growth Theory," Working Papers 2004-15, Brown University, Department of Economics.
  2. Hazan, Moshe & Zoabi, Hosny, 2005. "Does Longevity Cause Growth?," CEPR Discussion Papers 4931, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Becker, Gary S & Tomes, Nigel, 1986. "Human Capital and the Rise and Fall of Families," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 4(3), pages S1-39, July.
  4. Tomas Kögel, 2001. "Youth dependency and total factor productivity," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2001-030, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
  5. William Lord & Peter Rangazas, 2006. "Fertility and development: the roles of schooling and family production," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 11(3), pages 229-261, September.
  6. Francesco Caselli & Wilbur John Coleman II, 2006. "The World Technology Frontier," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(3), pages 499-522, June.
  7. Hanushek, Eric A, 1992. "The Trade-Off between Child Quantity and Quality," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(1), pages 84-117, February.
  8. Becker, Gary S & Lewis, H Gregg, 1973. "On the Interaction between the Quantity and Quality of Children," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 81(2), pages S279-88, Part II, .
  9. Galor, Oded & Moav, Omer, 1999. "From Physical to Human Capital Accumulation: Inequality in the Process of Development," CEPR Discussion Papers 2307, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  10. de la Croix,David & Michel,Philippe, 2002. "A Theory of Economic Growth," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521806428, 9.
  11. Bovenberg, A.L. & Ewijk, C. van, 1997. "Progressive taxes, equity and human capital accumulation in an endogenous growth model with overlapping generations," Open Access publications from Tilburg University urn:nbn:nl:ui:12-74442, Tilburg University.
  12. DE LA CROIX, David & DOEPKE, Matthias, . "Inequality and growth: why differential fertility matters," CORE Discussion Papers RP -1676, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
  13. Glomm, Gerhard & Ravikumar, B, 1992. "Public versus Private Investment in Human Capital Endogenous Growth and Income Inequality," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(4), pages 818-34, August.
  14. Ren, Liqian & Rangazas, Peter, 2003. "Retirement saving and development traps," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(1), pages 119-132, February.
  15. Becker, Gary S & Murphy, Kevin M & Tamura, Robert, 1990. "Human Capital, Fertility, and Economic Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(5), pages S12-37, October.
  16. Azariadis, Costas & Drazen, Allan, 1990. "Threshold Externalities in Economic Development," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, MIT Press, vol. 105(2), pages 501-26, May.
  17. David N. Weil & Oded Galor, 1999. "From Malthusian Stagnation to Modern Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(2), pages 150-154, May.
  18. Tabata, Ken, 2003. "Inverted U-shaped fertility dynamics, the poverty trap and growth," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 81(2), pages 241-248, November.
  19. Meijdam, A.C., 1998. "Taxes, Growth and Welfare in an Endogenous Growth Model with Overlapping Generations," Discussion Paper, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research 1998-133, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
  20. Paul Romer, 1989. "Endogenous Technological Change," NBER Working Papers 3210, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  21. Oded Galor & Omer Moav, 2006. "Das Human-Kapital: A Theory of the Demise of the Class Structure," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 73(1), pages 85-117.
  22. Glomm, Gerhard & Kaganovich, Michael, 2008. "Social security, public education and the growth-inequality relationship," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 52(6), pages 1009-1034, August.
  23. Galor, Oded & Moav, Omer, 2001. "Das Human Kapital," CEPR Discussion Papers 2701, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  24. Yakita, Akira, 2003. "Taxation and growth with overlapping generations," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(3-4), pages 467-487, March.
  25. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-42, July.
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Cited by:
  1. Ko Shakuno, 2014. "Public education, endogenous fertility and economic growth," TERG Discussion Papers, Graduate School of Economics and Management, Tohoku University 319, Graduate School of Economics and Management, Tohoku University.
  2. Ken-ichi Hashimoto & Ken Tabata, 2013. "Rising Longevity, Human Capital and Fertility in Overlapping Generations Version of an R&D-based Growth Model," Discussion Paper Series, School of Economics, Kwansei Gakuin University 104, School of Economics, Kwansei Gakuin University, revised May 2013.

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