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Tax Policy and Human Capital Formation with Public Investment in Education

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  • Simone Valente

    (Institute of Economic Research WIF , Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich ETH)

Abstract

This paper studies the effects of distortionary taxes and public investment in an endogenous growth OLG model with knowledge transmission. Fiscal policy affects growth in two respects: First, work time reacts to variations of prospective tax rates and modifies knowledge formation; second, public spending enhances labour efficiency but also stimulates physical capital through increased savings. It is shown that Ramsey-optimal policies reduce savings due to high tax rates on young generations, and are not necessarily growth-improving with respect to a pure private system. Non-Ramsey policies that shift the burden on adults are always growth-improving due to crowding-in effects: the welfare of all generations is unambiguously higher with respect to a private system, and there generally exists a continuum of non-optimal tax rates under which long-run growth and welfare are higher than with the Ramsey-optimal policy.

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File URL: http://128.118.178.162/eps/mac/papers/0507/0507002.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by EconWPA in its series Macroeconomics with number 0507002.

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Length: 30 pages
Date of creation: 07 Jul 2005
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpma:0507002

Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 30
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Web page: http://128.118.178.162

Related research

Keywords: Endogenous growth; Human capital; Overlapping generations; Tax policy; Public investment.;

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  1. Heijdra, Ben J & Ligthart, Jenny E, 2000. "The Dynamic Macroeconomic Effects of Tax Policy in an Overlapping Generations Model," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 52(4), pages 677-701, October.
  2. De Gregorio, Jose, 1996. "Borrowing constraints, human capital accumulation, and growth," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 49-71, February.
  3. Willem H. Buiter & Kenneth M. Kletzer, 1995. "Capital Mobility, Fiscal Policy and Growth under Self-Financing of Human Capital Formation," NBER Working Papers 5120, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Yakita, Akira, 2003. "Taxation and growth with overlapping generations," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(3-4), pages 467-487, March.
  5. de la Croix,David & Michel,Philippe, 2002. "A Theory of Economic Growth," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521806428, April.
  6. Jose De Gregorio & Se-Jik Kim, 1994. "Credit Markets with Differences in Abilities," IMF Working Papers 94/47, International Monetary Fund.
  7. Glomm, Gerhard & Ravikumar, B, 1992. "Public versus Private Investment in Human Capital Endogenous Growth and Income Inequality," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(4), pages 818-34, August.
  8. Eckstein, Zvi & Zilcha, Itzhak, 1994. "The effects of compulsory schooling on growth, income distribution and welfare," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(3), pages 339-359, July.
  9. Bovenberg, A.L. & Ewijk, C. van, 1997. "Progressive taxes, equity and human capital accumulation in an endogenous growth model with overlapping generations," Open Access publications from Tilburg University urn:nbn:nl:ui:12-74442, Tilburg University.
  10. Benhabib, Jess & Spiegel, Mark M., 1994. "The role of human capital in economic development evidence from aggregate cross-country data," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 143-173, October.
  11. Meijdam, A.C., 1998. "Taxes, Growth and Welfare in an Endogenous Growth Model with Overlapping Generations," Discussion Paper 1998-133, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
  12. Docquier, Frederic & Michel, Philippe, 1999. " Education Subsidies, Social Security and Growth: The Implications of a Demographic Shock," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 101(3), pages 425-40, September.
  13. W.H. Buiter & K Kletzer, 1995. "Capital Mobility," CEP Discussion Papers dp0245, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  14. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-42, July.
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Cited by:
  1. Valente, Simone, 2011. "Intergenerational externalities, sustainability and welfare—The ambiguous effect of optimal policies on resource depletion," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 995-1014.
  2. Simone Valente, 2007. "Human Capital, Resource Constraints and Intergenerational Fairness," CER-ETH Economics working paper series 07/68, CER-ETH - Center of Economic Research (CER-ETH) at ETH Zurich.

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